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History

Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Being for the Most Part Contributions by Union and Confederate Officers. Based Upon "The Century War Series." (USED)

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Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Being for the Most Part Contributions by Union and Confederate Officers. Based Upon "The Century War Series." (USED)

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Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Being for the Most Part Contributions by Union and Confederate Officers. Based Upon "The Century War Series." (USED)

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Battles That Changed History: The Battles That Decided the Fate of Nations (USED)

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Behind Enemy Lines: The True Story of a French Jewish Spy in Nazi Germany (USED)

Behind Enemy Lines: The True Story of a French Jewish Spy in Nazi Germany (USED)

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"[T]he amazing story of a woman who lived through one of the worst times in human history, losing family members to the Nazis but surviving with her spirit and integrity intact." --Publishers Weekly

Marthe Cohn was a young Jewish woman living just across the German border in France when Hitler rose to power. Her family sheltered Jews fleeing the Nazis, including Jewish children sent away by their terrified parents. But soon her homeland was also under Nazi rule. As the Nazi occupation escalated, Marthe's sister was arrested and sent to Auschwitz and the rest of her family was forced to flee to the south of France.

Always a fighter, Marthe joined the French Army and became a member of the intelligence service of the French First Army. Marthe, using her perfect German accent and blond hair to pose as a young German nurse who was desperately trying to obtain word of a fictional fiancé, would slip behind enemy lines to retrieve inside information about Nazi troop movements. By traveling throughout the countryside and approaching troops sympathetic to her plight--risking death every time she did so--she learned where they were going next and was able to alert Allied commanders.

When, at the age of eighty, Marthe Cohn was awarded France's highest military honor, the Médaille Militaire, not even her children knew to what extent this modest woman had helped defeat the Nazi empire. At its heart, this remarkable memoir is the tale of an ordinary human being who, under extraordinary circumstances, became the hero her country needed her to be.

bento de nursia (pai do monaquismo ocidental) (USED)

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Berlin Diary: The Journal of a Foreign Correspondent 1934-1931 (USED)

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Beumer & Co (USED)

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Beyond the Chindwin (USED)

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Big Policeman: The Rie and Fall of America's First, Most Ruthless, and Greatest Detective (USED)

Big Policeman: The Rie and Fall of America's First, Most Ruthless, and Greatest Detective (USED)

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The remarkable career of one of America's greatest detectives--
a story of murder, mayhem, and intrigue

Philip Marlowe, "Dirty Harry, " and even "Law & Order--"none of these would exist as they do today were it not for the legendary career of nineteenth-century New York City cop Thomas Byrnes. From 1854 to 1895, Byrnes rose through the ranks of the city's police department to become one of the most celebrated detectives in American history, a larger-than-life figure who paved the way for modern-day police methods, both good and bad.

During the age of "Gangs of New York," Byrnes solved many of the most sensational and high-profile cases in the city and the country. He captured Manhattan's Jack the Ripper copy-cat killer; solved the murder of prostitute Maude Merrill, who was killed by her jealous lover--her own uncle; solved the largest bank heist in American history; arrested anarchist Emma Goldman for inciting a riot in Union Square; and accomplished much more. For both good and ill, according to the "New York Times, "Byrnes "shaped not just the New York City Detective Bureau but the template for detective work . . . in every modern American metropolis." He not only pioneered crime scene investigation, but also perfected the brutal interrogation process called "the third degree." He revolutionized the gathering of evidence and was the first to use mug shots and keep criminal records. But when Police Commissioner Theodore Roosevelt investigated the corruption that had plagued the department for decades, the man one prominent journalist had dubbed the "big policeman" was forced to resign.Bringing the Gilded Age to life as he did in his acclaimed "King of Heists: The Sensational Bank Robbery of 1878 That Shocked America," J. North Conway narrates in thrilling, vivid detail the crimes, murders, corruption, and gritty police work associated with the father of the American detective.