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ALL USED BOOKS IN VERY GOOD TO EXCELLENT CONDITION -- MANY LIKE NEW!

History

A Summer of Hummingbirds (USED)

A Summer of Hummingbirds (USED)

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The country's most noted writers, poets, and artists converge at a singular moment in American life, a great companion to fans of the film A Quiet Passion, starring Cynthia Nixon as Emily Dickinson.

At the close of the Civil War, the lives of Emily Dickinson, Mark Twain, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Martin Johnson Heade intersected in an intricate map of friendship, family, and romance that marked a milestone in the development of American art and literature. Using the image of a flitting hummingbird as a metaphor for the gossamer strands that connect these larger-than-life personalities, Christopher Benfey re-creates the summer of 1882, the summer when Mabel Louise Todd-the protégé to the painter Heade-confesses her love for Emily Dickinson's brother, Austin, and the players suddenly find themselves caught in the crossfire between the Calvinist world of decorum, restraint, and judgment and a new, unconventional world in which nature prevails and freedom is all.

A Time for Reflection (USED)

A Time for Reflection (USED)

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William E Simon-quintessential American figure of the American century: Wall Street wunderkind, treasury secretary under Presidents Nixon and Ford, successful entrepreneur, US Olympic Committee president, best-selling author, pioneering philanthropist, and devout Catholic. Simon's insightful and often humorous autobiography, A Time for Reflection, includes a diverse cast of characters whose lives intersected with Simon's: from the president and his advisers at the White House; to the highest realms of the Catholic Church (in particular, Cardinal Egan), to celebrities, like actress Meryl Streep; and sports figures, like basketball coach Bobby Knight. In A Time for Reflection, Simon offers us some behind-the-scenes glimpses of history being made, including: President Nixon as Simon knew him, both in office and after; How Simon confronted Ronald Reagan during the Republican convention in 1980 to help nix the idea of a co-presidency with Gerald Ford; The tumult of the 1980 Moscow Olympic games, boycotted by the United States, and the 1984 Los Angeles games, boycotted by the Soviet Union; How Simon battled the Arab 'oil crisis' as 'energy czar' for President Nixon; Simon's fight in the Ford administration against Vice President Nelson Rockefeller on how to help a bankrupt New York City; Making the case for freedom with his best-selling books A Time for Truth and A Time for Action. Simon's fascinating life also encompassed sailing adventures -- including conquering the Northwest Passage from Alaska to Greenland and being named king by a group of Fiji islanders -- as well as adventures of the soul: giving away millions to charity; becoming a eucharistic minister; and helping to care for the sick, the poor, and the dying. William E Simon passed away on June 2000, but his autobiography, written in conjunction with and completed by John M Caher, is now published for the first time, a testimony to one of the truly impressive Americans of the twentieth century.
A Train in Winter (USED)

A Train in Winter (USED)

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New York Times Bestseller

A haunting account of bravery, friendship, and endurance. -Marie Claire

The riveting and little-known story of a group of female members of the French resistance who were deported together to Auschwitz, a remarkable number of whom survived.

In January 1943, 230 brave women of the French Resistance were sent to the death camps by the Nazis who had invaded and occupied their country. This is their story, told in full for the first time--a searing and unforgettable chronicle of terror, courage, defiance, survival, and the power of friendship.

Caroline Moorehead, a distinguished biographer, human rights journalist, and author of Dancing to the Precipice and Human Cargo, brings to life an extraordinary story that readers of Mitchell Zuckoff's Lost in Shangri-La, Erik Larson's In the Garden of Beasts, and Laura Hillenbrand's Unbroken will find an essential addition to our retelling of the history of World War II. A Train in Winter is a riveting, rediscovered story of courageous women who sacrificed everything to combat the march of evil across the world.

Abandon Ship! The Saga of the U.S.S. Indianapolis, the Navy's Greatest Sea Disaster (USED)

Abandon Ship! The Saga of the U.S.S. Indianapolis, the Navy's Greatest Sea Disaster (USED)

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She was a ship of destiny. Sailing across the Pacific, the battle scarred heavy cruiser U.S.S. Indianapolis had just delivered a secret cargo that would trigger the end of World War II. As she was continuing westward, her captain asked for a destroyer escort. He was told it wasn't necessary. But it was. She was torpedoed and sunk by a Japanese submarine. In twelve minutes, some 300 men went down with her. More then 900 others spent four horrific days and five nights in the ocean with no water to drink, savaged by a pitless sun and swarms of sharks. Incredibly, nobody knew they were out until a Navy patrol plane accidentally discovered them. Miraculously, 316 crewmen still survived. How could this have happened -- and why? This updated edition of Abandon Ship!, with a new introduction and afterword by Peter Maas, supplies the chilling answer. Originally published in 1958, Abandon Ship!, was the first book to describe, in vivid detail, the unspeakable ordeal the survivors of the Indianapolis endured. It was also the first book to scrutinize the role of the U.S. Navy in the Indianapolis saga, especially in the cruel aftermath of the rescue when Captain Charles Butler McVay III was courtmartialed and convicted of "hazarding" his ship.

The bitter controversy over the Navy's handling of this case has raged for decades, with the survivors leading a campaign to set the record straight and exonerate Captain McVay. Peter Maas, the author of the New York Times bestseller The Terrible Hours, reveals facts previously unavailable to Richard Newcomb and chronicles the forty-year crusade to restore the captain's good name, a crusade that started with the publication of this book. He also pays tribute to its author, who dared, ahead of his time, to expose military malfeasance and cover-up, and to inspire a courageous battle to correct a grave miscarriage of justice.

Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage (USED)

Abigail and John: Portrait of a Marriage (USED)

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"Fascinating...Gelles has provided a balanced portrait, and her mastery of the period's issues and history is evident on every page. Her treatment of the family... [is] written with understanding and sensitivity... But it is her strength as a feminist historian that makes her treatment of Abigail the most gripping... masterful and captivating."
-- Washington Times

"A landmark... Well-organized and expertly composed, the book is an impressive addition to the nation's written history."
-- Oklahoma City Oklahoman

Readers who enjoyed Doris Kearns Goodwin's No Ordinary Time, Cokie Roberts's Founding Mothers, and David McCullough's John Adams will love "this eminently readable... charming and sensitive, yet candid and unflinching joint biography" (Daniel Walker Howe, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848) of America's original "power couple" Abigail and John Adams.

Aboard The Fabre Line to Providence

Aboard The Fabre Line to Providence

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In an era when immigration was at its peak, the Fabre Line offered the only transatlantic route to southern New England. One of its most important ports was in Providence, Rhode Island. Nearly eighty-four thousand immigrants were admitted to the country b
Abolition for the People

Abolition for the People

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Edited by activist and former San Francisco 49ers super bowl quarterback Colin Kaepernick, Abolition for the People is a manifesto calling for a world beyond prisons and policing.

Abolition for the People brings together thirty essays representing a diversity of voices--political prisoners, grassroots organizers, scholars, and relatives of those killed by the anti-Black terrorism of policing and prisons. This collection presents readers with a moral choice: "Will you continue to be actively complicit in the perpetuation of these systems," Kaepernick asks in his introduction, "or will you take action to dismantle them for the benefit of a just future?"

Powered by courageous hope and imagination, Abolition for the People provides a blueprint and vision for creating an abolitionist future where communities can be safe, valued, and truly free. "Another world is possible," Kaepernick writes, "a world grounded in love, justice, and accountability, a world grounded in safety and good health, a world grounded in meeting the needs of the people."

The complexity of abolitionist concepts and the enormity of the task at hand can be overwhelming. To help readers on their journey toward a greater understanding, each essay in the collection is followed by a reader's guide that offers further provocations on the subject.

Newcomers to these ideas might ask: Is the abolition of the prison industrial complex too drastic? Can we really get rid of prisons and policing altogether? As writes organizer and New York Times bestselling author Mariame Kaba, "The short answer: We can. We must. We are."

Abolition for the People begins by uncovering the lethal anti-Black histories of policing and incarceration in the United States. Juxtaposing today's moment with 19th-century movements for the abolition of slavery, freedom fighter Angela Y. Davis writes "Just as we hear calls today for a more humane policing, people then called for a more humane slavery." Drawing on decades of scholarship and personal experience, each author deftly refutes the notion that police and prisons can be made fairer and more humane through piecemeal reformation. As Derecka Purnell argues, "reforms do not make the criminal legal system more just, but obscure its violence more efficiently."

Blending rigorous analysis with first-person narratives, Abolition for the People definitively makes the case that the only political future worth building is one without and beyond police and prisons.

You won't find all the answers here, but you will find the right questions--questions that open up radical possibilities for a future where all communities can thrive.

Abraham Lincoln: An Illustrated Biography

Abraham Lincoln: An Illustrated Biography

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The sixteenth president of the United States is regarded by many as the most courageous and diplomatic president during one of the most difficult times in American history. He was forced to deal with the secession of the southern states, the operations of the American Civil War and the antagonisms of political enemies in the North. Such a traumatic and momentous time called for a great leader, and Abraham Lincoln was the man to answer the challenge of a nation.

With less than a year of formal schooling, he rose above the hardscrabble childhood on the frontier through a debt-ridden early career as a circuit-riding country lawyer and minor politician, to national eminence and achievement. A sensitive man, prone to bouts of depression, Abraham Lincoln would provide crucial leadership to a country torn by Civil War. Although the price would be high, Lincoln saw that the United States must again become 'one nation indivisible.'

Over 125 rare photographs and prints supplement this riveting biography, revealing the life of this enigmatic fi gure. The Illustrated Biography of Abraham Lincoln is also a history of the United States during its most critical period, and a pictorial testament to the nation and the one man who held the nation together, a man described by Walt Whitman as 'the grandest fi gure on the crowded canvas of the drama of the nineteenth century.'

Abundance for What? (USED)

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Account of Mary Rowlandson and Other Indian Captivity Narratives

Account of Mary Rowlandson and Other Indian Captivity Narratives

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The wife of a minister in a small frontier town west of Boston, Mary Rowlandson was forced to leave her house in the late winter of 1676 after marauding Indians set the building on fire. "I had often before this said," she later wrote, "that if the Indians should come, I should chuse rather to be killed by them than taken alive but when it came to the tryal my mind changed; their glittering weapons so daunted my spirit, that I chose rather to go along . . . than to end my days."
Thus began Mary Rowlandson's account of her arduous journey as a servant to her captors, the Narragansett Indians. The most celebrated such document in American history, her record of the three months she spent in captivity tells of hardship and suffering, but also includes invaluable observations on Native American life and customs. The text is notable, as well, for conveying an understanding of her captors as individuals who not only suffered and faced difficult decisions but were also, at times, sympathetic humans (one of her abductors gave her a Bible taken during an earlier raid).
An immediate bestseller when first published in 1682, Rowlandson's narrative is widely regarded today as a classic--the first in a series of "captivity narratives" in which women, seized by Indians, survived against overwhelming odds. Of special interest to historians and students of Native American culture, Rowlandson's astounding account -- accompanied by three other famous narratives of captivity -- will also thrill the most avid of adventure enthusiasts.