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Biography

Seasons of the Heart

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Seeing Sideways: A Memoir of Music and Motherhood

Seeing Sideways: A Memoir of Music and Motherhood

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Doony, Ryder, Wyatt, Bodhi. The names of Kristin Hersh's sons are the only ones included in her new memoir, Seeing Sideways. As the book unfolds and her sons' voices rise from its pages, it becomes clear why: these names tell the story of her life.

This story begins in 1990, when Hersh is the leader of the indie rock group Throwing Muses, touring steadily, and the mother of a young son, Doony. The chapters that follow reveal a woman and mother whose life and career grow and change with each of her sons: the story of a custody battle for Doony is told alongside that of Hersh's struggles with her record company and the resulting PTSD; the tale of breaking free from her record label stands in counterpoint to her recounting of her pregnancy with Ryder; a period of writer's block coincides with the development of Wyatt as an artist and the family's loss of their home; and finally, soon after Bodhi's arrival, Hersh and her boys face crises from which only strange angels can save them. Punctuated with her own song lyrics, Seeing Sideways is a memoir about a life strange enough to be fiction, but so raw and moving that it can only be real.

Seven Pillars of Wisdom (USED)

Seven Pillars of Wisdom (USED)

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In his classic book, T.E. Lawrence--forever known as Lawrence of Arabia--recounts his role in the origin of the modern Arab world. At first a shy Oxford scholar and archaeologist with a facility for languages, he joined and went on to lead the Arab revolt against the Ottoman Turks while the rest of the world was enmeshed in World War I. With its richly detailed evocation of the land and the people Lawrence passionately believed in, its incisive portraits of key players, from Faisal ibn Hussein, the future Hashemite king of Syria and Iraq, to General Sir Edmund Allenby and other members of the British imperial forces, The Seven Pillars of Wisdom is an indispensible primary historical source. It helps us to understand today's Middle East, while giving us thrilling accounts of military exploits (including the liberation of Aqaba and Damascus), clandestine activities, and human foibles.
She Wasn't the One

She Wasn't the One

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Diana Garlington tells her tragic story of losing a child to gun violence. Thanksgiving Day was filled with a lot of love, laughter and eating delicious food with family. The following day, November 26th, 2011, would be the very opposite. This day would leave Diana's family and friends broken and devastated. Esscence was an outspoken, 110 pound girl, who was born to a 22 year old single mother. She had 3 siblings, which they lovingly called her Boopsie. Because of her intelligence and questioning demeanor even as as a young child, Esscence had dreamed of one day becoming a lawyer. And that would be just it, a dream. From experiencing some sort of generational curse to motherhood at the tender age of 14; Esscence would begin to live her life on the edge. She would be hit by a car at 11, hurt in a horrific car accident at the age of 13, and tragically lose a nephew, two brothers, and a best friend. That would be just the beginning of her end. She would later become entangled with an older man who would charm her into living a lifestyle that would lead her on a path of abuse, lies, drama, and eventually her death.
She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders (USED)

She's Not There: A Life in Two Genders (USED)

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A memoir that tells the story of a person who changed genders chronicles the life of James, a critically acclaimed novelist, who eventually became Jenny, a happy and successful English professor.

Shifting Sands: Life in Arabia with a Saudi Princess (USED)

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Shoot the Widow (USED)

Shoot the Widow (USED)

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The first rule of biography, wrote Justin Kaplan: "Shoot the widow."
In her new book, Meryle Secrest, acclaimed biographer ("Knowing, sympathetic and entertainingly droll"--"The New York Times"), writes about her comic triumphs and misadventures as a biographer in search of her nine celebrated subjects, about how the hunt for a "life" is like working one's way through a maze, full of fall starts, dead ends, and occasional clear passages leading to the next part of the puzzle.
She writes about her first book, a life of Romaine Brooks, and how she was led to Nice and given invaluable letters by her subject's heir that were slid across the table, one at a time; how she was led to the villa of Brooks' lover, Gabriele d'Annunzio (poet, playwright, and aviator), a fantastic mausoleum left untouched since the moment of his death seventy years before; to a small English village, where she uncovered a lost Romaine Brooks painting; and finally, to 20, rue Jacob, Paris, where Romaine's lover, Natalie Barney, had fifty years before entertained Cocteau, Gide, Proust, Colette, and others.
Secrest describes how her next book--a life of Berenson--prompted Francis Steegmuller, fellow biographer, to comment that he wouldn't touch the subject with a ten-foot pole.
For her life of British art historian Kenneth Clark, Secrest was given permission to write the book by her subject, who surreptitiously financed it in the hopes of controlling its contents; we see how Clark's plan was foiled by a jealous mistress and a stash of love letters that helped Secrest navigate Clark's obstacle course.
Among the other biographical (mis)adventures, Secrest reveals: how she tracked Salvador Dali to a hospital room, found him recovering from serious burns sustained in a mysterious fire, and learned that he was knee-deep in a scandal involving fake drawings and prints and surrounded by dangerous characters out of Murder, Inc. . . . and how she went in search of a subject's grave (Frank Lloyd Wright's) only to find that his body had been dug up to satisfy the whim of his last wife.
A fascinating account of a life spent in sometimes arduous, sometimes comical, always exciting pursuit of the truth about other lives.
Silverlining

Silverlining

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Elizabeth Beisel, a three-time Olympic swimmer, two-time Olympic medalist, and Olympic Team captain for the United States, shares a raw and honest account of her journey towards becoming one of the best athletes in the world, and the successes and failures that came along the way.

When Elizabeth Beisel watched the Olympics on television for the first time, she was seven years old in her parents' living room. She decided right then and there she would compete at the Olympic Games one day. Eight years later, she made her first of three Olympic Teams as a fifteen-year-old.

Despite her huge success in the sport, Elizabeth struggled with doubts, failures, and injuries throughout her entire swimming career. In Silver Lining, she gives a compelling look inside the pressures that come with being an Olympian, and how she mentally conquered the stress of competing at the highest level for over a decade.

From a small-town girl with a dream to winning Olympic medals, Elizabeth gives you a glimpse inside her life as you've never seen it before. She is relatable, open, and honest, and her storytelling in Silver Lining will leave you feeling emotional and inspired to pursue your own dreams, no matter who you are.

Reviews
"Silver Lining is a story of amazing perseverance of one of the greatest leaders in our sports history." - Rowdy Gaines

"You will be inspired, and also discover why Elizabeth is one of the most respected athletes to grace a pool deck for Team USA." - Katie Ledecky

"Elizabeth wonderfully captures what it means to be an elite athlete.Silver Lining shows how perseverance, dedication, and a support team can help one overcome life's biggest obstacles."
- Caeleb Dressel

About the Author
Elizabeth Beisel is a three-time Olympic swimmer and two-time Olympic medalist for the United States of America. Visit her at www.elizabethbeisel.com.

Simple Government

Simple Government

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The New York Times bestseller that offers clear solutions to the key issues facing our nation.

Armed with little money but a lot of common sense, former Arkansas governor Mike Huckabee surprised the nation by coming in second during the 2008 Republican presidential primaries. He connected with millions of voters by calling for a smaller, simpler government that would get out of the way when appropriate.

Now he's written a book that sums up the twelve things we really need from Washington to get the country back on the right track. These twelve essential truths can help us tone down the partisan rancor and return to the simple principles of the Founding Fathers: liberty, justice, personal freedom, and civic virtue.

Huckabee is one of the country's most popular Republicans, and his voice will carry for years to come.

Singin' and Swingin' and Gettin' Merry Like Christmas (USED)

Singin' and Swingin' and Gettin' Merry Like Christmas (USED)

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Here Maya Angelou, dazzling entertainer, casts the spotlight on her show business career -- a pageant of international scope. Maya, the woman, shares her sad, failed marriage to a white man, her early motherhood and achingly sensitive relationship with her young son, and her bone-deep, painful suspicion of the white world that welcomes her talent so dramatically ...

"Honest, funny and heartwarming... The strenth o the book is Angelou's lyrical writing... a God-given gift." -- "The Washington Star."

"The buoyant, gifted Maya Angelou continues her autobiography... both her joy and her despair have twice as much impact as most people's." -- "New York Magazine."

Sins of the Father; Joseph Kennedy and the Dynasty He Founded (USED)

Sins of the Father; Joseph Kennedy and the Dynasty He Founded (USED)

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From the New York Times bestselling author of 20 books about the Secret Service, FBI, and CIA comes the detailed account of the life and times of the ambitious, powerful, masterfully manipulative Joseph Patrick Kennedy.

For all his wealth and power, Joe Kennedy was not a happy man. He also had no shame. What he cared about was having power. Through the political dynasty that he founded, he achieved that for generations to come. If he hurt and corrupted others in the process, no one had the courage to challenge him.

The results are the myths that continue to enshrine the Kennedy family and maintain it as a national obsessions. This book explodes those myths. Utilizing extensive research and interviews with Kennedy family members and their intimates, speaking on record for the first time, Kessler reveals stunning details of Joseph Kennedy's enormous accomplishments and the terrible personal losses he suffered.

Soemwhere in Italy V-Mails From My Father

Soemwhere in Italy V-Mails From My Father

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First Sergeant Robert E Bell loved Italy and the warmth and hospitality of the people who welcomed the Americans into their country. His infantry - the Fifth - marched through the entire country from Salerno, Anzio, Naples and Rome to Florence and Milan crossing over the Apennines to eventual victory in May of 1945.

Solo: A memoir of hope (USED)

Solo: A memoir of hope (USED)

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The Glass Castle meets A League of Their Own in Solo, a candid and moving memoir about family, loss, and reconciliation from Hope Solo, the supremely talented, headline-making goalkeeper for the U.S. women's national soccer team.

During the 2011 Women's World Cup, Solo became an idol, role model, and sex symbol to a new generation of young American sports enthusiasts, inspiring the kind of intense devotion not seen since the days of Mia Hamm.

An Olympic gold medalist and arguably America's sexiest athlete, Hope has been featured on the cover of Sports Illustrated (twice), in ESPN: The Magazine, and as a contestant on the hit ABC television show Dancing with the Stars, and her poignant, compelling, and profoundly inspiring personal history will score big with her legion of fans.

Some Girls My Life in a Harem (USED)

Some Girls My Life in a Harem (USED)

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A jaw-dropping story of how a girl from the suburbs ends up in a prince's harem, and emerges from the secret Xanadu both richer and wiser

At eighteen, Jillian Lauren was an NYU theater school dropout with a tip about an upcoming audition. The casting director told her that a rich businessman in Singapore would pay pretty American girls $20,000 if they stayed for two weeks to spice up his parties. Soon, Jillian was on a plane to Borneo, where she would spend the next eighteen months in the harem of Prince Jefri Bolkiah, youngest brother of the Sultan of Brunei, leaving behind her gritty East Village apartment for a palace with rugs laced with gold and trading her band of artist friends for a coterie of backstabbing beauties.

More than just a sexy read set in an exotic land, Some Girls is also the story of how a rebellious teen found herself-and the courage to meet her birth mother and eventually adopt a baby boy.

Song for Mary; An Irish-American Memory (USED)

Song for Mary; An Irish-American Memory (USED)

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Dennis Smith mixes humor in the face of adversity with moving insight as he tells what it was like to be young, Irish, Catholic and poor. It is a tale in which the presence of Dennis's courageous mother, Mary, is never far off, and the mystery of what has happened to Dennis's father underlies all. As Dennis ages from seven to twenty-five, we see him learn life's indelible lessons - how to dodge the slaps of crotchety nuns, wallop a punching bag, refuse to "take crap" from anyone, steal a longed-for kiss, and, finally, stare into death's face.

Songs for Ivy; A Love Story of Hope and Resilience

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South and West (USED)

South and West (USED)

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From the best-selling author of the National Book Award-winning The Year of Magical Thinking two extended excerpts from her never-before-seen notebooks--writings that offer an illuminating glimpse into the mind and process of a legendary writer.

Joan Didion has always kept notebooks: of overheard dialogue, observations, interviews, drafts of essays and articles--and here is one such draft that traces a road trip she took with her husband, John Gregory Dunne, in June 1970, through Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. She interviews prominent local figures, describes motels, diners, a deserted reptile farm, a visit with Walker Percy, a ladies' brunch at the Mississippi Broadcasters' Convention.

She writes about the stifling heat, the almost viscous pace of life, the sulfurous light, and the preoccupation with race, class, and heritage she finds in the small towns they pass through. And from a different notebook: the California Notes that began as an assignment from Rolling Stone on the Patty Hearst trial of 1976. Though Didion never wrote the piece, watching the trial and being in San Francisco triggered thoughts about the city, its social hierarchy, the Hearsts, and her own upbringing in Sacramento.

Here, too, is the beginning of her thinking about the West, its landscape, the western women who were heroic for her, and her own lineage, all of which would appear later in her acclaimed 2003 book, Where I Was From.

One of TIME's most anticipated books of 2017

One of The New York Times Book Review's "What You'll Be Reading in 2017"

Includued among the Best Books of March 2017 by both LitHub and Signature


Spare Parts (USED)

Spare Parts (USED)

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Finalist for the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize

New York Times Best Seller

Four undocumented Mexican American students, two great teachers, one robot-building contest . . . and a major motion picture

In 2004, four Latino teenagers arrived at the Marine Advanced Technology Education Robotics Competition at the University of California, Santa Barbara. They were born in Mexico but raised in Phoenix, Arizona, where they attended an underfunded public high school. No one had ever suggested to Oscar, Cristian, Luis, or Lorenzo that they might amount to much--but two inspiring science teachers had convinced these impoverished, undocumented kids from the desert who had never even seen the ocean that they should try to build an underwater robot.

And build a robot they did. Their robot wasn't pretty, especially compared to those of the competition. They were going up against some of the best collegiate engineers in the country, including a team from MIT backed by a $10,000 grant from ExxonMobil. The Phoenix teenagers had scraped together less than $1,000 and built their robot out of scavenged parts. This was never a level competition--and yet, against all odds . . . they won!

But this is just the beginning for these four, whose story--which became a key inspiration to the DREAMers movement--will go on to include first-generation college graduations, deportation, bean-picking in Mexico, and service in Afghanistan.

Joshua Davis's Spare Parts is a story about overcoming insurmountable odds and four young men who proved they were among the most patriotic and talented Americans in this country--even as the country tried to kick them out.

Spoken from the Heart (USED)

Spoken from the Heart (USED)

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In this brave, beautiful, and deeply personal memoir, Laura Bush, one of our most beloved and private first ladies, tells her own extraordinary story.

Born in the boom-and-bust oil town of Midland, Texas, Laura Welch grew up as an only child in a family that lost three babies to miscarriage or infant death. She vividly evokes Midland's brash, rugged culture, her close relationship with her father, and the bonds of early friendships that sustain her to this day. For the first time, in heart-wrenching detail, she writes about the devastating high school car accident that left her friend Mike Douglas dead and about her decades of unspoken grief.

When Laura Welch first left West Texas in 1964, she never imagined that her journey would lead her to the world stage and the White House. After graduating from Southern Methodist University in 1968, in the thick of student rebellions across the country and at the dawn of the women's movement, she became an elementary school teacher, working in inner-city schools, then trained to be a librarian. At age thirty, she met George W. Bush, whom she had last passed in the hallway in seventh grade. Three months later, the old maid of Midland married Midland's most eligible bachelor. With rare intimacy and candor, Laura Bush writes about her early married life as she was thrust into one of America's most prominent political families, as well as her deep longing for children and her husband's decision to give up drinking. By 1993, she found herself in the full glare of the political spotlight. But just as her husband won the Texas governorship in a stunning upset victory, her father, Harold Welch, was dying in Midland.

In 2001, after one of the closest elections in American history, Laura Bush moved into the White House. Here she captures presidential life in the harrowing days and weeks after 9/11, when fighter-jet cover echoed through the walls and security scares sent the family to an underground shelter. She writes openly about the White House during wartime, the withering and relentless media spotlight, and the transformation of her role as she began to understand the power of the first lady. One of the first U.S. officials to visit war-torn Afghanistan, she also reached out to disease-stricken African nations and tirelessly advocated for women in the Middle East and dissidents in Burma. She championed programs to get kids out of gangs and to stop urban violence. And she was a major force in rebuilding Gulf Coast schools and libraries post-Katrina. Movingly, she writes of her visits with U.S. troops and their loved ones, and of her empathy for and immense gratitude to military families.

With deft humor and a sharp eye, Laura Bush lifts the curtain on what really happens inside the White House, from presidential finances to the 175-year-old tradition of separate bedrooms for presidents and their wives to the antics of some White House guests and even a few members of Congress. She writes with honesty and eloquence about her family, her public triumphs, and her personal tribulations. Laura Bush's compassion, her sense of humor, her grace, and her uncommon willingness to bare her heart make this story revelatory, beautifully rendered, and unlike any other first lady's memoir ever written.

Stealth Boat; Fighting the Cold War in a Fast-Attack Submarine

Stealth Boat; Fighting the Cold War in a Fast-Attack Submarine

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The mission of the U.S. Navy's fast attack submarines during the Cold War was a closely guarded secret for many years, but this look back at the period and the part played by those submarines in winning the war gives readers a close-up view of life in one of those subs, USS Sturgeon (SSN637). McHale's memoir covers the years from 1967 to 1970, when as a teenager he was assigned to the nuclear submarine. The book focuses on McHale's experiences and those of other men with whom he served who have remained his lifelong friends and how those Cold War years at sea profoundly affected the way he lived the rest of his life.
Steel Will

Steel Will

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On February 19, 2007, SSG Shilo Harris was patrolling an infamous southern Iraqi roadway when his Humvee was struck by an IED. Moments later, three members of his crew were dead and Shilo had sustained severe burns over 35 percent of his body, lost his ears and the skin off his face, and lost much of the use of his badly mangled fingers. This fiery moment was just the beginning of an arduous road laced with pain, emotional anguish, and much soul-searching. For forty-eight days Shilo lay trapped in a medically induced coma as his wife, unable to ease his suffering, had to come to grips with a man utterly changed.
This is the story of a young boy raised in a small Texas town under the heavy yoke of a father struggling with the personal aftermath of his service in Vietnam. This is the story of the first human being to participate in extracellular stem cell regeneration to regrow lost body parts. This is the story of the survivor not only of an explosion but of more than sixty surgeries to restore both form and function to his broken body. This is the story of the wife who stood by his side, made hard decisions, and continues to support her husband through his struggles with PTSD.
This is the story of a God who reshapes us into the people he wants us to be. And in that way, this is the story of all of us.
Anyone whose life has been touched by tragedy and loss, especially military families dealing with PTSD, TBI, amputations, and other realities of wartime service, will find strength, encouragement, and inspiration in this moving memoir.
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Steve Jobs; A Biographic Portrait

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This is a stunning visual guide to the life and works of entrepreneur Steve Jobs. Easily one of the most influential innovators of the twenty-first century, Steve Jobs has fundamentally shaped the way in which we communicate and, even more broadly, live our lives.

In this information-packed graphic biography, Steve Jobs' remarkable talent and genius are explored through bold design and original graphics. Kevin Lynch explores Jobs' journey from savvy salesman, to his rivalry and market competition with Bill Gates, and his shift towards radical innovations in later life. This technological innovator led a fascinating, astounding and ultimately too short life, that irreversibly impacted how we communicate.

Steve Jobs is a visual celebration and comprehensive study of 'The Maverick' and his work; and a must-have for any fan of Apple products.
Stories I Only Tell My Friends (USED)

Stories I Only Tell My Friends (USED)

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A wryly funny and surprisingly moving account of an extraordinary life lived almost entirely in the public eye

A teen idol at fifteen, an international icon and founder of the Brat Pack at twenty, and one of Hollywood's top stars to this day, Rob Lowe chronicles his experiences as a painfully misunderstood child actor in Ohio uprooted to the wild counterculture of mid-seventies Malibu, where he embarked on his unrelenting pursuit of a career in Hollywood.

"The Outsiders" placed Lowe at the birth of the modern youth movement in the entertainment industry. During his time on "The West Wing," he witnessed the surreal nexus of show business and politics both on the set and in the actual White House. And in between are deft and humorous stories of the wild excesses that marked the eighties, leading to his quest for family and sobriety.

Never mean-spirited or salacious, Lowe delivers unexpected glimpses into his successes, disappointments, relationships, and one-of-a-kind encounters with people who shaped our world over the last twenty-five years. These stories are as entertaining as they are unforgettable.

Stories I Only Tell My Friends (USED)

Stories I Only Tell My Friends (USED)

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A wryly funny and surprisingly moving account of an extraordinary life lived almost entirely in the public eye

A teen idol at fifteen, an international icon and founder of the Brat Pack at twenty, and one of Hollywood's top stars to this day, Rob Lowe chronicles his experiences as a painfully misunderstood child actor in Ohio uprooted to the wild counterculture of mid-seventies Malibu, where he embarked on his unrelenting pursuit of a career in Hollywood.

The Outsiders placed Lowe at the birth of the modern youth movement in the entertainment industry. During his time on The West Wing, he witnessed the surreal nexus of show business and politics both on the set and in the actual White House. And in between are deft and humorous stories of the wild excesses that marked the eighties, leading to his quest for family and sobriety.

Never mean-spirited or salacious, Lowe delivers unexpected glimpses into his successes, disappointments, relationships, and one-of-a-kind encounters with people who shaped our world over the last twenty-five years. These stories are as entertaining as they are unforgettable.

Stories I Tell Myself: Growing Up with Hunter S. Thompson

Stories I Tell Myself: Growing Up with Hunter S. Thompson

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Hunter S. Thompson, "smart hillbilly," boy of the South, born and bred in Louisville, Kentucky, son of an insurance salesman and a stay-at-home mom, public school-educated, jailed at seventeen on a bogus petty robbery charge, member of the U.S. Air Force (Airmen Second Class), copy boy for Time, writer for The National Observer, et cetera. From the outset he was the Wild Man of American journalism with a journalistic appetite that touched on subjects that drove his sense of justice and intrigue, from biker gangs and 1960s counterculture to presidential campaigns and psychedelic drugs. He lived larger than life and pulled it up around him in a mad effort to make it as electric, anger-ridden, and drug-fueled as possible.

Now Juan Thompson tells the story of his father and of their getting to know each other during their forty-one fraught years together. He writes of the many dark times, of how far they ricocheted away from each other, and of how they found their way back before it was too late.

He writes of growing up in an old farmhouse in a narrow mountain valley outside of Aspen--Woody Creek, Colorado, a ranching community with Hereford cattle and clover fields . . . of the presence of guns in the house, the boxes of ammo on the kitchen shelves behind the glass doors of the country cabinets, where others might have placed china and knickknacks . . . of climbing on the back of Hunter's Bultaco Matador trail motorcycle as a young boy, and father and son roaring up the dirt road, trailing a cloud of dust . . . of being taken to bars in town as a small boy, Hunter holding court while Juan crawled around under the bar stools, picking up change and taking his found loot to Carl's Pharmacy to buy Archie comic books . . . of going with his parents as a baby to a Ken Kesey/Hells Angels party with dozens of people wandering around the forest in various stages of undress, stoned on pot, tripping on LSD . . .

He writes of his growing fear of his father; of the arguments between his parents reaching frightening levels; and of his finally fighting back, trying to protect his mother as the state troopers are called in to separate father and son. And of the inevitable--of mother and son driving west in their Datsun to make a new home, a new life, away from Hunter; of Juan's first taste of what "normal" could feel like . . .

We see Juan going to Concord Academy, a stranger in a strange land, coming from a school that was a log cabin in the middle of hay fields, Juan without manners or socialization . . . going on to college at Tufts; spending a crucial week with his father; Hunter asking for Juan's opinion of his writing; and he writes of their dirt biking on a hilltop overlooking Woody Creek Valley, acting as if all the horrible things that had happened between them had never taken place, and of being there, together, side by side . . .

And finally, movingly, he writes of their long, slow pull toward reconciliation . . . of Juan's marriage and the birth of his own son; of watching Hunter love his grandson and Juan's coming to understand how Hunter loved him; of Hunter's growing illness, and Juan's becoming both son and father to his father . . .

Story Of My Life

Story Of My Life

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An American classic rediscovered by each generation, The Story of My Life is Helen Keller's account of her triumph over deafness and blindness. Popularized by the stage play and movie The Miracle Worker, Keller's story has become a symbol of hope for people all over the world.

This book-published when Keller was only twenty-two-portrays the wild child who is locked in the dark and silent prison of her own body. With an extraordinary immediacy, Keller reveals her frustrations and rage, and takes the reader on the unforgettable journey of her education and breakthroughs into the world of communication. From the moment Keller recognizes the word "water" when her teacher finger-spells the letters, we share her triumph as "that living word awakened my soul, gave it light, hope, joy, set it free!" An unparalleled chronicle of courage, The Story of My Life remains startlingly fresh and vital more than a century after its first publication, a timeless testament to an indomitable will.

Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit (USED)

Stranger in the Woods: The Extraordinary Story of the Last True Hermit (USED)

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A National Geographic Best Book of the Year

National Bestseller

Many people dream of escaping modern life. Most will never act on it--but in 1986, twenty-year-old Christopher Knight did just that when he left his home in Massachusetts, drove to Maine, and disappeared into the woods. He would not have a conversation with another person for the next twenty-seven years.

Drawing on extensive interviews with Knight himself, journalist Michael Finkel shows how Knight lived in a tent in a secluded encampment, developing ingenious ways to store provisions and stave off frostbite during the winters. A former alarm technician, he stealthily broke into nearby cottages for food, books, and supplies, taking only what he needed but sowing unease in a community plagued by his mysterious burglaries. Since returning to the world, he has faced unique challenges--and compelled us to reexamine our assumptions about what makes a good life. By turns riveting and thought-provoking, The Stranger in the Woods gives us a deeply moving portrait of a man determined to live his own way.

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Stranger; Barack Obama in the White House

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Chuck Todd's gripping, fly-on-the-wall account of Barack Obama's tumultuous struggle to succeed in Washington.

Barack Obama won the presidency in 2008 partly because he was a Washington outsider. But if he'd come to the White House thinking he could change the political culture, he soon discovered just how difficult it was to swim against an upstream of insiders, partisans, and old guard networks allied to undermine his agenda -- including members of his own party. He would pass some of the most significant legislation in American history, but his own weaknesses torpedoed some of his greatest hopes.

In The Stranger, Chuck Todd draws upon his unprecedented inner-circle sources to create a gripping account of Obama's White House tenure, from the early days of drift and helplessness to a final stand against the GOP in which an Obama, at last liberated from his political future, finally triumphs.

Streetcar to Justice: How Elizabeth Jennings Won the Right to Ride in New York (USED)

Streetcar to Justice: How Elizabeth Jennings Won the Right to Ride in New York (USED)

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Starred reviews hail Streetcar to Justice as a book that belongs in any civil rights library collection (Publishers Weekly) and completely fascinating and unique" (Kirkus). An ALA Notable Book and winner of a Septima Clark Book Award from the National Council for the Social Studies.

Bestselling author and journalist Amy Hill Hearth uncovers the story of a little-known figure in U.S. history in this fascinating biography.

In 1854, a young African American woman named Elizabeth Jennings won a major victory against a New York City streetcar company, a first step in the process of desegregating public transportation in Manhattan.

This illuminating and important piece of the history of the fight for equal rights, illustrated with photographs and archival material from the period, will engage fans of Phillip Hoose's Claudette Colvin and Steve Sheinkin's Most Dangerous.

One hundred years before Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, Elizabeth Jennings's refusal to leave a segregated streetcar in the Five Points neighborhood of Manhattan set into motion a major court case in New York City.

On her way to church one day in July 1854, Elizabeth Jennings was refused a seat on a streetcar. When she took her seat anyway, she was bodily removed by the conductor and a nearby police officer and returned home bruised and injured. With the support of her family, the African American abolitionist community of New York, and Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Jennings took her case to court. Represented by a young lawyer named Chester A. Arthur (a future president of the United States) she was victorious, marking a major victory in the fight to desegregate New York City's public transportation.

Amy Hill Hearth, bestselling author of Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years, illuminates a lesser-known benchmark in the struggle for equality in the United States, while painting a vivid picture of the diverse Five Points neighborhood of Manhattan in the mid-1800s.

Includes sidebars, extensive illustrative material, notes, and an index.

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Suffering Ends When Awakening Begins (USED)

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HOW DOES A CHILD'S LIFE CHANGE WHEN HIS MOTHER TRIES TO MURDER HIM? It's one of the most profound betrayals imaginable, and it can follow the victim into adulthood, into all he does with his life, tainting his sense of self and his relationships with others. How does a man's life change when he discovers that with his thoughts, his imagination, and his ability to listen to his higher self, he has the power to overcome the devastating events of his past and build a new life and a family?

THIS IS THE INSPIRING TRUE STORY of Robert Crown's amazing journey out of the darkness of his childhood and into a world brightly illuminated by the power of positive understanding and purposeful thought. It's the story of rejecting the victimhood he once embraced and finding the answers that allowed him to embrace the power to create a new life using universal spiritual laws.

"In this book, Robert Crown not only shares the intensity of his outer life story but also the intimacy of the inner journey he took as a spiritual warrior determined to be victorious through an evolution of consciousness from the inside out."

--Michael Bernard Beckwith, author of Spiritual Liberation and Life Visioning

Survival; The Story of a Sixteen-Year-Old Jewish Boy (USED)

Survival; The Story of a Sixteen-Year-Old Jewish Boy (USED)

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The personal story of a teenage boy in the concentration camps of the Holocaust. It begins with his deportation in 1942 to the Belgium concentration camp of Breendonk at the age of 16 and follows his movements through a series of camps until 1945, concluding with the Auschwitz death march and his return to Belgium.
Swamp Water, Abalone Shells, Basted Eggs, Sow Belly and Nettles

Swamp Water, Abalone Shells, Basted Eggs, Sow Belly and Nettles

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Several hundred years ago there were Indians and ponies in the Hill Country of Southern California . . . . . . in an area between Temecula and Warner Hot Springs. They were peaceful people with existence in a mountainous, temperate, beautiful climate having only to work and prepare for the moons ahead. There were no warring factions or invaders then. It was a joy to live.


Then the White Man came. The' 'Butterfield Stage" came right through here and ended nearby. My relatives helped settle this territory. I am very proud to be a fifth generation Californian. I sat on my Great, Great Grandmother Lucia's lap and I have the pictures to prove it. I am not all proud of the White Man Coming. I know where the Red Man made his arrowheads and stored his cooking pots and ollas. In respect, I will not tell.


This story is of the Hill Country as I saw it. The Red Man is there today. The "Reservation" is not a home, it is a place to stay. Few of God's Red Children are left. The hills are beautiful, but empty. What can I say?


I can remember and I have. It feels good to remember. It can hurt to forget. Don't ever say ... "Good-bye," say ......so long. "

Sweet Dreams are Made of This: A Life in Music (USED)

Sweet Dreams are Made of This: A Life in Music (USED)

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A no-holds-barred look into the remarkable life and career of the prolific musician, songwriter, and producer behind Eurythmics and dozens of pop hits.

Dave Stewart's life has been a wild ride--one filled with music, constant reinvention, and the never-ending drive to create. Growing up in industrial northern England, he left home for the gritty London streets of the seventies, where he began collaborating and performing with various musicians, including a young waitress named Annie Lennox.

The chemistry between Stewart and Lennox was undeniable, and an intense romance developed. While their passion proved too much offstage, they thrived musically and developed their own sound. They called themselves Eurythmics and launched into global stardom with the massively popular album Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This).

For the first time, Stewart shares the incredible, high-octane stories of his life in music--the drug-fueled adventures, the A-list collaborations and relationships, and the creative process that brought us blockbusters from Eurythmics like " Here Comes the Rain Again" and "Would I Lie to You" as well as Tom Petty's "Don't Come Around Here No More," No Doubt's "Underneath It All," Golden Globe winner "Old Habits Die Hard" with Mick Jagger, and many more.

From great friendships and creative partnerships including the group SuperHeavy along with Jagger, Joss Stone, Damian Marley, and A. R. Rahman, to inspired performances and intimate moments in the studio--Stewart highlights the musicians he admires and calls friends, from Bob Dylan, Stevie Nicks, Elton John, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr to Bono, Bon Jovi, and Katy Perry.

With a behind-the-scenes look at Stewart's innovative endeavors that keep him on the cutting-edge of the music business, Sweet Dreams Are Made of This is a one-of-a-kind portrait of the creative heart of one of its most gifted and enterprising contributors.

With a Foreword by Mick Jagger!

Swimming to Antarctica

Swimming to Antarctica

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International Swimming Hall of Famer and Alex Award-winner Lynne Cox's classic sports memoir Swimming to Antarctica is a portrait of rare and relentless drive (Sports Illustrated).Here is the acclaimed life story of a woman whose determination inspires everyone she touches. Lynne Cox started swimming almost as soon as she could walk. By age sixteen, she had broken all records for swimming the English Channel. Her daring eventually led her to the Bering Strait, where she swam five miles in thirty-eight-degree water in just a swimsuit, cap, and goggles. In between those accomplishments, she became the first to swim the Strait of Magellan, narrowly escaped a shark attack off the Cape of Good Hope, and was cheered across the twenty-mile Cook Strait of New Zealand by dolphins. She even swam a mile in the Antarctic.Lynne writes the same way she swims, with indefatigable spirit and joy, and shares the beauty of her time in the water with a poet's eye for detail. And this paperback edition of Swimming to Antarctica expands upon the detail of her extraordinary atheleticism with exclusive photos and maps throughout.
Sword and Blossom

Sword and Blossom

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This real-life Madame Butterfly is the tragic love story of an aristocraticBritish officer and a young Japanese woman in turn-of-the-20th-century Tokyo.368 pp.
Taken Out of Laos

Taken Out of Laos

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With communist forces poised to overtake her home country of Laos, and her father already sent off to die in the work camps, six-year-old Dee, her mother, and her siblings begin the unthinkable act of escaping the only place they know and love.Then after a chance meeting with an American priest, Dee's mother makes the difficult decision to relocate them all to America - a distant land they had only heard about.What follows is the heart-wrenching story of family bonds, hope and survival. It's a story of courage, racism, and abandoned personal and cultural identity. It's the story of a young woman trying to come to terms with who she is in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds. And it's the story of a shocking and unlikely reunion that would change everything.

Teacher Man (USED)

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Teacher Man (USED)

Teacher Man (USED)

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Nearly a decade ago Frank McCourt became an unlikely star when, at the age of sixty-six, he burst onto the literary scene with Angela's Ashes, the Pulitzer Prize -- winning memoir of his childhood in Limerick, Ireland. Then came 'Tis, his glorious account of his early years in New York.

Now, here at last, is McCourt's long-awaited book about how his thirty-year teaching career shaped his second act as a writer. Teacher Man is also an urgent tribute to teachers everywhere. In bold and spirited prose featuring his irreverent wit and heartbreaking honesty, McCourt records the trials, triumphs and surprises he faces in public high schools around New York City. His methods anything but conventional, McCourt creates a lasting impact on his students through imaginative assignments (he instructs one class to write An Excuse Note from Adam or Eve to God), singalongs (featuring recipe ingredients as lyrics), and field trips (imagine taking twenty-nine rowdy girls to a movie in Times Square!).

McCourt struggles to find his way in the classroom and spends his evenings drinking with writers and dreaming of one day putting his own story to paper. Teacher Man shows McCourt developing his unparalleled ability to tell a great story as, five days a week, five periods per day, he works to gain the attention and respect of unruly, hormonally charged or indifferent adolescents. McCourt's rocky marriage, his failed attempt to get a Ph.D. at Trinity College, Dublin, and his repeated firings due to his propensity to talk back to his superiors ironically lead him to New York's most prestigious school, Stuyvesant High School, where he finally finds a place and a voice. Doggedness, he says, is not as glamorous as ambition or talent or intellect or charm, but still the one thing that got me through the days and nights.

For McCourt, storytelling itself is the source of salvation, and in Teacher Man the journey to redemption -- and literary fame -- is an exhilarating adventure.

Teachers; A Tribute to the Enlightened, the Exceptional, the Extraordinary (USED)

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Most of them aren't famous, but the work they do makes them heroes. These are the teachers who encourage, enlighten, and inspire their young charges every day. In this celebration of the world's second-oldest profession, photographer Gary Firstenburg and writer John Yow have captured the guiding spirit of these special people.Teachers highlights a broad range of uniquely dedicated and creative professionals and covers the education landscape from inner-city public schools to university campuses. Superb photographs, compelling stories, and an elegant design combine to make this a rare and much-deserved tribute to teachers everywhere.
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The Angriest Childhood in the World

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The World's Angriest Childhood is writer Barry Norman's second book, joining Flipping Point as a stream of consciousness look into his mind as he delves with current issues of anger, loneliness and depression to discover how things came to be, not just for himself, but hopefully, for others as well. The books flow through several events, interactions relationships and memories that have shaped his life. By opening up to the both the humorous and heartbreaking events, he hopes to answer the ultimate question as posed in the famous Talking Heads song, "Once in a Lifetime" - "how did I get here?"
The Appalachian Trail: A Biography (USED)

The Appalachian Trail: A Biography (USED)

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The Appalachian Trail is America's most beloved trek, with millions of hikers setting foot on it every year. Yet few are aware of the fascinating backstory of the dreamers and builders who helped bring it to life over the past century.

The conception and building of the Appalachian Trail is a story of unforgettable characters who explored it, defined it, and captured national attention by hiking it. From Grandma Gatewood--a mother of eleven who thru-hiked in canvas sneakers and a drawstring duffle--to Bill Bryson, author of the best-selling A Walk in the Woods, the AT has seized the American imagination like no other hiking path. The 2,000-mile-long hike from Georgia to Maine is not just a trail through the woods, but a set of ideas about nature etched in the forest floor. This character-driven biography of the trail is a must-read not just for ambitious hikers, but for anyone who wonders about our relationship with the great outdoors and dreams of getting away from urban life for a pilgrimage in the wild.

The Best of James Herriot; Favorite Memories of a Country Vet (USED)

The Best of James Herriot; Favorite Memories of a Country Vet (USED)

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A beautifully illustrated collection of favorite stories from all four of James Herriot's volumes of memoirs. Full-color photography and fascinating marginal notes in a one-of-a-kind gift book.

The Brecht; A Memoir (USED)

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The Catcher was a Spy; The Mysterious Life of Mo Berg (USED)

The Catcher was a Spy; The Mysterious Life of Mo Berg (USED)

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The stories about Moe Berg - his behavior, his intelligence, his charm - are legion, as are the unanswered questions posed by his life. A baseball player and a spy, he was one of the most colorful men to pursue either line of work. He played in the major leagues from 1923 through 1939 and then became a coach for the Boston Red Sox. It was not, however, as a player that Berg earned his highest accolades, but as a dugout savant (it was said that Berg, educated at Princeton, the Sorbonne, and Columbia, could speak a dozen languages but couldn't hit in any of them). A month after Pearl Harbor, the day after his father - who had never approved of Berg's choice of career - died, Berg announced his departure from baseball and entered the world of diplomacy and espionage. But only now has the extent of his work for the OSS in determining Germany's atomic bomb capability been revealed. The Catcher Was a Spy provides one of the few thoroughly documented accounts of a real spy's life. Equally compelling is Nicholas Dawidoff's account of Berg after the war. A secretive man who had a reputation for appearing and disappearing without warning, Berg has long been the subject of wonder and speculation. Behind the enigma of Moe Berg was a life of fantastic and fascinating complexity - a life that has never been pieced together so seamlessly and to such riveting effect as it is now in what David Remnick calls "a stunning biography."
The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race

The Code Breaker: Jennifer Doudna, Gene Editing, and the Future of the Human Race

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The bestselling author of Leonardo da Vinci and Steve Jobs returns with a gripping account of how Nobel Prize winner Jennifer Doudna and her colleagues launched a revolution that will allow us to cure diseases, fend off viruses, and have healthier babies.

When Jennifer Doudna was in sixth grade, she came home one day to find that her dad had left a paperback titled The Double Helix on her bed. She put it aside, thinking it was one of those detective tales she loved. When she read it on a rainy Saturday, she discovered she was right, in a way. As she sped through the pages, she became enthralled by the intense drama behind the competition to discover the code of life. Even though her high school counselor told her girls didn't become scientists, she decided she would.

Driven by a passion to understand how nature works and to turn discoveries into inventions, she would help to make what the book's author, James Watson, told her was the most important biological advance since his co-discovery of the structure of DNA. She and her collaborators turned a curiosity ​of nature into an invention that will transform the human race: an easy-to-use tool that can edit DNA. Known as CRISPR, it opened a brave new world of medical miracles and moral questions.

The development of CRISPR and the race to create vaccines for coronavirus will hasten our transition to the next great innovation revolution. The past half-century has been a digital age, based on the microchip, computer, and internet. Now we are entering a life-science revolution. Children who study digital coding will be joined by those who study genetic code.

Should we use our new evolution-hacking powers to make us less susceptible to viruses? What a wonderful boon that would be! And what about preventing depression? Hmmm...Should we allow parents, if they can afford it, to enhance the height or muscles or IQ of their kids?

After helping to discover CRISPR, Doudna became a leader in wrestling with these moral issues and, with her collaborator Emmanuelle Charpentier, won the Nobel Prize in 2020. Her story is a thrilling detective tale that involves the most profound wonders of nature, from the origins of life to the future of our species.

The DeMilles (USED)

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A sweeping, multigenerational account of DeMille family history written in a lively, intimate style, this book is copiously illustrated. Also included are personal interviews with celebrities who knew and worked with the DeMilles.
The Dr. Broad; A Mafia Love Story

The Dr. Broad; A Mafia Love Story

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For decades starting in the 1950s, Raymond Patriarca ran the New England Mafia out of a storefront in Providence, Rhode Island. By 1980 he was seventy-two years old, and suffering from diabetes and heart disease. One night in December of that year his life intersected with that of Dr. Barbara Roberts, a thirty-six-year old single mother of three, who was the first female cardiologist to practice in Rhode Island. Asked by Raymond's family to check on him after he was arrested on capital charges, Barbara--a naive Alice in Wonderland--entered a looking-glass world populated by pitfalls, moral ambiguities and dangers for which her devout upbringing had not prepared her. How did a former Catholic schoolgirl from a working-class family become the physician and defender of one Mafioso, and the mistress of another? How did her children handle these scandalous associations and the resulting hostile publicity--and what were the reactions of their fathers?

Expanding on the story first told in the popular Crimetown podcast, this memoir is a tale of motherhood, political activism, controversy, heartbreak and survival; it traces one woman's trajectory against the backdrop of America's 20th century upheavals.

The Eagle and the Rose (USED)

The Eagle and the Rose (USED)

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Transcending the tremendous national bestsellers Embraced by the Light and The Celestine Prophecy, here is the remarkable, true story of a gifted psychic medium and her guide from the other world, who has shown her how to harness her powers to heal, astral-travel, and perform soul rescues.
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The Good Life (USED)

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He's that regular guy from Astoria, Queens, who left his heart in San Francisco. He's the postwar heartthrob who inspired hundreds of young girls to wear black outside St. Patrick's Cathedral on his wedding day. He's the darling of the MTV generation who made music history when, at the age of 68, he won the coveted Grammy Award for Album of the Year. He's the consummate artist known worldwide for his paintings. He's Tony Bennett, whose star shines brighter than ever as he enters his fifth decade of performing. Now, for the first time, this legend shares his amazing life story -- in a voice that's pure Tony Bennett: warm, resonant, and unforgettable. "Tony Bennett has not just bridged the generation gap, he has demolished it, " praised "The New York Times." Since his appearance with the Red Hot Chili Peppers of the 1993 MTV Video Awards, and the addition of his seminal video, 'Steppin' Out, ' to the MTV playlist, Bennett has become the hottest -- and coolest -- pop-culture icon for today's younger listeners, while remaining beloved by their parents and grandparents. An astonishing four generations have experienced the Tony Bennett magic -- the mesmerizing spell of a singer in love with singing, who embraces his audience with a soulful serenity communicated by both the man and his music.
The Journals (USED)

The Journals (USED)

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In 1963, John Fowles won international recognition with "The Collector, " his first published novel. In the years following--with the publication of "The Magus, " "The French Lieutenant's Woman," "The Ebony Tower, " and his other critically acclaimed works of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry--Fowles took his place among the most innovative and important English novelists of our time. Now, with this first volume of his journals, which covers the years from 1949 to 1965, we see revealed not only the creative development of a great writer but also the deep connection between Fowles's autobiographical experience and his literary inspiration.
Commencing in Fowles's final year at Oxford, the journals in this volume chronicle the years he spent as a university lecturer in France; his experiences teaching school on the Greek island of Spetsai (which would inspire "The Magus") and his love affair there with the married woman who would later become his first wife; and his return to England and his ongoing struggle to achieve literary success. It is an account of a life lived in total engagement with the world; although Fowles the novelist takes center stage, we see as well Fowles the nascent poet and critic, ornithologist and gardener, passionate naturalist and traveler, cinephile and collector of old books.
Soon after he fell in love with his first wife, Elizabeth, Fowles wrote in his journal, "She has asked me not to write about her in here. But I could not not write, loving her as I do. . . . What else I betrayed, I could not betray this diary." It is that determined, unsparing honesty and forthrightness that imbues these journals with all the emotional power and narrative complexity of his novels. They are a revelation of both the man and the artist.