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Biography

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Churched

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He spent his childhood trapped within the confines of countless bizarre, strict rules. And lived to tell about it.

In this first-hand account, author Matthew Paul Turner shares amusing-sometimes cringe-worthy-and poignant stories about growing up in a fundamentalist household, where even well-intentioned contemporary Christian music was proclaimed to be "of the devil."

churched is a collection of stories that detail an American boy's experiences growing up in a culture where men weren't allowed let their hair grow to touch their ears ("an abomination!"), women wouldn't have been caught dead in a pair of pants (unless swimming), and the pastor couldn't preach a sermon without a healthy dose of hellfire and brimstone. Matthew grapples with the absurdity of a Sunday School Barbie burning, the passionate annual boxing match between the pastor and Satan, and the holiness of being baptized a fifth time-while growing into a young man who, amidst the chaotic mess of religion, falls in love with Jesus.

Class of 1969

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Generations of families drove past those old, creepy stone cottages in the Sockanosset neighborhood of Cranston Rhode Island. And generations of terrified children were put on strict notice -- misbehave, and you might find yourself locked up in that terrible "Bad Boys School."The Class of 1969 is the story of one of those children who was not only threatened like so many other kids his age, but due to chronic behavioral problems brought on by a childhood full of loss and poverty, found himself incarcerated at Sockanosset - formally known as the Rhode Island Training School. There, he would be "rehabilitated" by the state, endure violence, face racial unrest, and battle profound loneliness while attempting to come to terms with who he was and what he had become.And it's also the story of a troubled teen spiraling into the dark depths of crime and alcohol dependency, and the inspirational journey of spiritual awakening that saved his life. And at the center of it all were those iconic stone cottages, and hundreds of boys just like him locked-up and lost in a terrifying, brutal and cold-hearted system.
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Clinton, Inc. (USED)

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Weekly Standard editor Daniel Halper provides a meticulously researched account of the brilliant calculations, secret deals, and occasionally treacherous maneuverings that led to the Clintons' return to political prominence.

In the twelve years since the Clintons left the White House, they have gone from being virtually penniless to multi-millionaires, and are arguably the most popular politicians in America--respected and feared by Republicans and Democrats alike. But behind that rise is a never-before-told story of strategic cleverness, reckless gambles, and an unquenchable thirst for political power.

Investigative reporter Daniel Halper uses a wealth of research, exclusive documents, and detailed interviews with close friends, allies, and enemies of the Clintons to reveal the strategy they used and the deals they made to turn their political fortunes around. Clinton, Inc. exposes the relationship between President Obama, the Bush family, and the Clintons--and what it means for the future; how Bill and Hillary are laying the groundwork for the upcoming presidential campaign; how Vice President Biden and other Democrats are trying to maneuver around her; Chelsea's political future; the Clintons' skillful media management; the Clintons' marriage and why it has survived; and an inside look at the Clinton's financial backers and hidden corporate enterprises.

Clinton, Inc. is the key to understanding America's most powerful political couple.

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Closure: The Untold Story of the Ground Zero Recovery Mission (USED)

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One of the four Operations Commanders of the World Trade Center site chronicles the rescue and recovery mission at Ground Zero from September 11, 2001, through the end of operations on May 30, 2002, while telling the story of his own struggle to make peace with all that he saw there.

On the morning of 9/11, the Port Authority Police Department was the first uniformed service to respond to the attack on the World Trade Center. When the towers collapsed, thirty-seven of its officers were killed -- the largest loss of law enforcement officers in U.S. history.That afternoon, Lieutenant William Keegan began the work of recovery. The FDNY and NYPD had the territory, but Keegan had the map. PA cops could stand on top of six stories of debris and point to where a stairwell had been; they used PATH tunnels to enter "the pile" from underneath. "Closure" includes many never-before-told stories, including how Keegan and his officers recovered 1,000 tons of gold and silver from a secret vault to keep the Commodities Exchange from crashing; discovered what appeared to be a black box from one of the planes that hit the towers; and helped raise the inspirational steel beam cross that has become the site's icon.

For nine brutal months, the men at Ground Zero wrestled with 1.8 million tons of shattered concrete, twisted steel, body parts, political pressure, and their own grief. "Closure" tells the unforgettable story of their sacrifice and valor, and how Keegan led the smallest of all the uniformed services at the site to become the most valuable.

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Coal to Cream (USED)

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Eugene Robinson didn't expect to have his world turned upside down when he accompanied a group of friends and acquaintances to the beach at Ipanema in Rio de Janeiro one sunny afternoon. He had recently moved to South America as the new correspondent for the "Washington Post," a position he had sought not only as an exciting professional challenge but also as a means of escape from the poisonous racial atmosphere in America's cities, which he experienced firsthand as a reporter and editor covering city politics in Washington, D.C. Black and white wouldn't matter so much, he thought, if he gave himself a little distance from the problem.

At first Robinson saw Brazil as a racial paradise, where people of all hues and colors mingled together on the beaches, in the samba schools, and at "carnaval." But that day on the beach, his most basic assumptions about race were shattered when he was told that he didn't have to be black in Brazil if he didn't want to be. The society looked at people through a broad spectrum of colors, ranging from "white" to "coffee with milk" to "after midnight," and not as members of two rigidly defined races. Like most African Americans, Robinson had always recognized the existence of color gradations within the black community -- the members of his own family span the entire range from coal to cream -- but he never looked at color the same way after that encounter at Ipanema.

"Coal to Cream" is the story of Robinson's personal exploration of race, color, identity, culture, and heritage, as seen through the America of his youth and the South America he discovered, forging a new consciousness about himself, his people, and his country. As he immersedhimself in Brazilian culture, Robinson began to see that its focus on color and class -- as opposed to race -- presents problems of its own. Discrimination and inequality still exist, but without a sense of racial identity, the Brazilians lack the anger and vocabulary they need to attack or even describe such ills. Ultimately, Robinson came to realize that racial identity, what makes him not just an American but a "black" American, is a gift of great value -- a shared language of history and experience -- rather than the burden it had sometimes seemed.

A penetrating look at race relations in the United States and much of the rest of the hemisphere, "Coal to Cream" is both a personal memoir and a striking comment on the times in which we live. At a time when many are calling for the abandonment of racial identity, Robinson cautions that we should be careful what we wish for, lest we get it.

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Come and See (USED)

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Unlike most books of photographs about Mother Teresa, Come and See is very unique. It combines the text of a journal handwritten by photojournalist Linda Schaefer as well as some 160 full color photographs taken as she lived and worked with the Missionaries of Charities and the international team of volunteers in various facilities run by Mother Teresa throughout India. Schaefer had decided many years ago that she wanted to shoot a pictorial on Mother Teresa and her work. Finally in 1995 she had a brief encounter with the living saint during a visit to Atlanta. This renewed her passion to photograph the nun in her natural surroundings and share a different look at Mother Teresa with the world. This was not an easy task. Mother Teresa was opposed to "another book" about her. As she put it, "too many people are making money and none of it gets to the poor who really need it." After accepting a challenge from Mother Teresa to put her cameras down and go to work in the orphanages and houses of the dying, Schaefer finally received the answer to her prayers. Mother Teresa penned a note to Linda granting her complete and unfettered access to her facilities, the Missionaries of Charity, the international team of volunteers, and thousands of poor and sick. The result is a book that was created around the dictates of Mother Teresa. As she put it, she wanted the people who picked up this book to see "her world" -- the environment in which she lived and shared her love. She wanted viewers to actually "see, smell and hear" the real world in which she lived and worked.. She didn't want a book packed full of individual photos of herself, and so Schaefer's work portrays all of the component parts thatmade up the world of Mother Teresa. This is the focus of Come and See.
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Come On shore and We Will Kill and Eat You All: A New Zealand Story (USED)

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In this involving, compassionate memoir, Christina Thompson tells the story of her romance and eventual marriage to a Maori man, interspersing it with a narrative history of the cultural collision between Westerners and the Maoris of New Zealand. Despite their significant differences, Thompson and her husband, Seven, share a similar sense of adventure and a willingness to depart from the customs of their families and forge a life together on their own. Thompson explores cultural displacement through the ages and the fascinating history of Europeans in the South Pacific, beginning with Abel Tasman's discovery of New Zealand in 1642. Yet at its core, this is the story of two people who meet, fall in love, and are forever changed.
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Comes the Peace (USED)

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An inspiring and deeply personal memoir that tells the story of Daja Meston, a child abandoned by his American hippie parents and left to live in a Tibetan monastery in Nepal in the 1960s. Comes the Peace is a moving, eloquent story of love, hope, and forgiveness.

Coming of Age in Samoa (USED)

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Complete Civil War Journal of Thomas Wentworth Higginson (USED)

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"I desire to record, as simply as I may, the beginnings of a momentous military experiment, whose ultimate results were the reorganization of the whole American army and the remoulding of the relations of two races on this continent. . . . I can only hope that the importance of the subject may save me from that egotism which makes great things seem little and little things seem less in the narrating."
So wrote Thomas Wentworth Higginson about his role in one of the most compelling and fascinating episodes in the history of the United States. As the colonel of the first regiment of black men in the Union army during the Civil War, Higginson was an early, articulate, and powerful crusader for civil rights, and his journal and letters, collected for the first time in this volume, present some of the most extraordinary documents of the Civil War.
Higginson was a politically engaged intellectual at the forefront of radical antislavery, labor, and feminist causes. Born in 1823 to a formerly wealthy but still prominent Brahmin family, he became one of America's leading social activists and a prominent writer, minister, and reformer. With the publication in 1869 of his classic "Army Life in a Black Regiment," which drew on this journal, Higginson became one of the most important chroniclers of the Civil War. "The Complete Civil War Journal and Selected Letters of Thomas Wentworth Higginson" is the first comprehensive edition of his journal. Sensitively and thoroughly annotated by Christopher Looby and supplemented by a large selection of Higginson's wartime letters, this volume offers the most vivid and intimate picture of the radical interracial solidarity brought about by the transformative experience of the army camp and of Civil War life.
"The immediacy of Higginson's reflections, as well as their sharp insights, make this journal both distinctive and enduringly compelling . . . . Higginson's vivid texts can once again educate, gratify and delight readers." "Publishers Weekly"
"This volume will enrich our understanding of the transformations that emancipation and war wrought." "Library Journal""
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Compromised: Counterintelligence and the Threat of Donald J. Trump

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"Peter Strzok is the FBI agent who started it all."--David Martin, CBS Sunday Morning

"This is the book I have been waiting for."--Rachel Maddow

The FBI veteran behind the Russia investigation draws on decades of experience hunting foreign agents in the United States to lay bare the threat posed by President Trump.

When he opened the FBI investigation into Russia's election interference, Peter Strzok had already spent more than two decades defending the United States against foreign threats. His career in counterintelligence ended shortly thereafter, when the Trump administration used his private expression of political opinions to force him out of the Bureau in August 2018. But by that time, Strzok had seen more than enough to convince him that the commander in chief had fallen under the sway of America's adversary in the Kremlin.

In Compromised, Strzok draws on lessons from a long career--from his role in the Russian illegals case that inspired The Americans to his service as lead FBI agent on the Mueller investigation--to construct a devastating account of foreign influence at the highest levels of our government. And he grapples with a question that should concern every U.S. citizen: When a president appears to favor personal and Russian interests over those of our nation, has he become a national security threat?

Confessions of a Cold War Warrior (USED)

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Confessions of a Counterfeit Farm Girl (USED)

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A laugh-out-loud memoir about a city slicker who discovers that Manolos and manure just don't mix.

At her husband's prompting, suburban mom and New York career woman Susan McCorkindale agreed to give up her stressful six-figure job. Together, they headed down south to a 500-acre beef farm, and never looked back. Well, he didn't look back. She did. A lot.

From playing ?spot the religious billboard? on the drive to rural Virginia, to adapting to a world without Starbucks, to planning bright-orange hunter-resistant wardrobes for the kids (?We moved here to get away from the madness of Manhattan only to risk getting popped on our own property?), this is her hilarious account of how a city girl came to love?or at least tolerate?country life.

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Country Matters (USED)

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With his inimitable sense of humor and storytelling talent, New York Times bestselling author Michael Korda brings us this charming, hilarious, self-deprecating memoir of a city couple's new life in the country.

At once entertaining, canny, and moving, Country Matters does for Dutchess County, New York, what Under the Tuscan Sun did for Tuscany. This witty memoir, replete with Korda's own line drawings, reads like a novel, as it chronicles the author's transformation from city slicker to full-time country gentleman, complete with tractors, horses, and a leaking roof.

When he decides to take up residence in an eighteenth-century farmhouse in Dutchess County, ninety miles north of New York City, Korda discovers what country life is really like:

  • Owning pigs, more than owning horses, even more than owning the actual house, firmly anchored the Kordas as residents in the eyes of their Pleasant Valley neighbors.
  • You may own your land, but without concertina barbed wire, or the 82nd Airborne on patrol, it's impossible to keep people off it!
  • It's possible to line up major household repairs over a tuna melt sandwich.
  • And everyone in the area is fully aware that Michael "don't know shit about septics."

    The locals are not particularly quick to accept these outsiders, and the couple's earliest interactions with their new neighbors provide constant entertainment, particularly when the Kordas discover that hunting season is a year-round event -- right on their own land! From their closest neighbors, mostly dairy farmers, to their unforgettable caretaker Harold Roe -- whose motto regarding the local flora is "Whack it all back! " -- the residents of Pleasant Valley eventually come to realize that the Kordas are more than mere weekenders.

    Sure to have readers in stitches, this is a book that has universal appeal for all who have ever dreamed of owning that perfect little place to escape to up in the country, or, more boldly, have done it.

  • Crossing the Bamboo Bridge

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    This vivid, compulsively readable memoir of courage, grief and redemption illuminates the life of Mai, a young girl from Vietnam's rice fields, who risks everything to escape poverty, abuse and war. Her battle is not against soldiers but against her neighbors and a thousand years of tradition. Born during Ho Chi Minh's revolution against the French, she was just a baby when his followers in the village, out of spite, came to her home one night and murdered the men in the family, driving her mother mad with fear and rage. She was fourteen when her mother forced her to marry and have a child with a brutal man who beat and tortured her, finally leaving her for dead beside the road. Recovered, she ran away with her infant son, only to discover there was no place for them. To save her baby's life, she returned home in disgrace, only to face the Viet Cong. In desperation she escaped again, leaving her child in safety, she thought. On Saigon's deadly streets, with no identity papers, she became an outlaw, hiding from her ex-husband, grieving for her lost child. Homeless, penniless and pursued, only her dream of freedom kept her alive. Then one day she would meet a saintly woman, who gave her hope, and an Irish-American naval officer, who gave her love. Crossing the Bamboo Bridge is a tale of mothers and daughters, and of their children. It is a tale of war, and grief, and a young girl's dreams. It is a stunning epiphany of hope where there is none, of courage in the face of despair, of love, respect and freedom.

    Dancing Out of Time

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    When her husband, Tom, suggested they leave Rhode Island for sunny Florida during the winter months, Barbara had to make a decision. Would she leave the career she loved as a psychiatric nurse therapist and drama therapist? Is she ready for retirement: What would they do in Florida?This is the story of friendship, faith and healing as Tom and Barbara face challenging and devastating losses and much joy. Their journey along with six aging couples shows how important our family and friends, and our faith in the Lord is when facing these new experiences and the maladies of aging. This inspirational story, told with humor brings hope and joy and peace to others in the golden years.The characters in The Blessed House and The Red Dress come alive and continue to dance on the pages of Dancing Out of Time.
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    Dante (USED)

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    Only R.W.B. Lewis-the renowned biographer and author of The City of Florence-could write so insightfully about Dante Alighieri, Florence's famous son. In Dante he traces the life and complex development-emotional, artistic, philosophical-of this supreme poet-historian, from his wanderings through Tuscan hills and splendid churches to his days as a young soldier fighting for democracy, and to his civic leadership and years of embittered exile from the city that would fiercely reclaim him a century later.

    Lewis reveals the boy who first encounters the mythic Beatrice, the lyric poet obsessed with love and death, the grand master of dramatic narrative and allegory, and his monumental search for ultimate truth in The Divine Comedy. It is in this masterpiece of self-discovery and redemption that Lewis finds Dante's own autobiography-and the sum of all his shifting passions and epiphanies.

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    Dapper Dan: Made in Harelm

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    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - "Dapper Dan is a legend, an icon, a beacon of inspiration to many in the Black community. His story isn't just about fashion. It's about tenacity, curiosity, artistry, hustle, love, and a singular determination to live our dreams out loud."--Ava DuVernay, director of Selma, 13th, and A Wrinkle in Time

    NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY VANITY FAIR

    With his now-legendary store on 125th Street in Harlem, Dapper Dan pioneered high-end streetwear in the 1980s, remixing classic luxury-brand logos into his own innovative, glamorous designs. But before he reinvented haute couture, he was a hungry boy with holes in his shoes, a teen who daringly gambled drug dealers out of their money, and a young man in a prison cell who found nourishment in books. In this remarkable memoir, he tells his full story for the first time.

    Decade after decade, Dapper Dan discovered creative ways to flourish in a country designed to privilege certain Americans over others. He witnessed, profited from, and despised the rise of two drug epidemics. He invented stunningly bold credit card frauds that took him around the world. He paid neighborhood kids to jog with him in an effort to keep them out of the drug game. And when he turned his attention to fashion, he did so with the energy and curiosity with which he approaches all things: learning how to treat fur himself when no one would sell finished fur coats to a Black man; finding the best dressed hustler in the neighborhood and converting him into a customer; staying open twenty-four hours a day for nine years straight to meet demand; and, finally, emerging as a world-famous designer whose looks went on to define an era, dressing cultural icons including Eric B. and Rakim, Salt-N-Pepa, Big Daddy Kane, Mike Tyson, Alpo Martinez, LL Cool J, Jam Master Jay, Diddy, Naomi Campbell, and Jay-Z.

    By turns playful, poignant, thrilling, and inspiring, Dapper Dan: Made in Harlem is a high-stakes coming-of-age story spanning more than seventy years and set against the backdrop of an America where, as in the life of its narrator, the only constant is change.

    Praise for Dapper Dan: Made in Harlem

    "Dapper Dan is a true one of a kind, self-made, self-liberated, and the sharpest man you will ever see. He is couture himself."--Marcus Samuelsson, New York Times bestselling author of Yes, Chef

    "What James Baldwin is to American literature, Dapper Dan is to American fashion. He is the ultimate success saga, an iconic fashion hero to multiple generations, fusing street with high sartorial elegance. He is pure American style."--André Leon Talley, Vogue contributing editor and author

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    Darkness to Light

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    Fame. Sex. Pain. Drugs. Death. Booze. Money. Addiction. Redemption. Dizzying heights. Rock-bottom depths. Desperation and elation--sometimes in the same hour. Not to mention power . . . and the struggle for it.

    The world knows Lamar Odom as a two-time NBA world champion who rocketed to uncharted heights of fame thanks to being a member of both the storied Los Angeles Lakers and the ubiquitous Kardashian empire.

    But who is Lamar, really?

    Fans have long praised his accessibility and genuine everyman quality--he is a blinding talent who has suffered a series of heartaches, setback, and loss. But until now, his most candid moments have remained behind closed doors . . . sometimes face-down on the floor.

    In Darkness to Light, Lamar gives readers an intimate look into his life like never before. His exclusive and revealing memoir recounts the highs and lows of fame and his struggle with his demons along the way to self-discovery and redemption. From the pain of his unraveled marriage to Khloé Kardashian to the harmful vices he used to cope--and the near-death experience that made him rethink everything about his life--this is Lamar as you have never before seen him.

    Lamar brings basketball fans directly into the action of a game during the Lakers championship years. He shares his personal account of the lifelong passion that started as one shining light in a childhood marked by loss and led to his international fame as one of the most extraordinary athletes of all time. In this profoundly honest book, Lamar invites you to walk with him through the good times and bad, while looking ahead to a brighter future.

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    David Brinkley, A Memoir (USED)

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    He is an Icon of the American airwaves, a face and a voice we have been welcoming into our homes for the past half-century. Through times of great upheaval and interludes of business as usual, we have tuned in to David Brinkley's programs on NBC and now on ABC - The Huntley-Brinkley Report, David Brinkley's Journal, This Week with David Brinkley - for his sense of fairness and his distinctive ability to cut through cant and pretension. We know that when he delivers the news it will be cogent, trustworthy and stamped with his trademark sardonic wit. Since his arrival in Washington in 1943 we have heard our history unfold in his unmistakable North Carolina cadences, yet in an age of information overload he is deeply appreciated for being a professional talker who doesn't believe in talking too much. Rich in anecdote and humor, David Brinkley's is a classic American story that overlaps with some of the great events and great personages of our era. He shares priceless moments, public and private: playing poker with Harry Truman, riding the rails with Winston Churchill, being whisked off by helicopter to Camp David by Lyndon Johnson, receiving the Medal of Freedom from George Bush, walking the beach with D Day veterans. And he takes aim at some chronic American bugbears - including taxes and political conventions - from his own, uniquely Brinkley, vantage point.
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    David Brinkley: A Memoir (USED)

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    David Brinkley, icon of the American airwaves, has written his autobiography, a classic American story which overlaps with some of the great events and important personages of the era. From playing poker with Truman to riding the rails with Churchill to walking the beaches with D-Day veterans, readers are privy to some of Brinkley's most priceless remembrances. of photos.

    Days of Grace (USED)

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    An inspiring memoir by the late Arthur Ashe--tennis champion, social activist, AIDS victim, man of courage and grace. Ashe tells about the athlete's life; tennis court contemporaries such as Connors, McEnroe, and Navratilova; his passionate devotion to his wife and daughter; the places he has been; people he has known; and more. Photos.

    Dear Genius... A Memoir of My Life with Truman Capote (USED)

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    Death of a King

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    A revealing and dramatic chronicle of the twelve months leading up to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s assassination.

    Martin Luther King, Jr. died in one of the most shocking assassinations the world has known, but little is remembered about the life he led in his final year. New York Times bestselling author and award-winning broadcaster Tavis Smiley recounts the final 365 days of King's life, revealing the minister's trials and tribulations -- denunciations by the press, rejection from the president, dismissal by the country's black middle class and militants, assaults on his character, ideology, and political tactics, to name a few -- all of which he had to rise above in order to lead and address the racism, poverty, and militarism that threatened to destroy our democracy.

    Smiley's Death of a King paints a portrait of a leader and visionary in a narrative different from all that have come before. Here is an exceptional glimpse into King's life -- one that adds both nuance and gravitas to his legacy as an American hero.

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    Decline and Fall of the House of Windsor (USED)

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    Today's royals have become the world's greatest media stars, as scandal, gossip, and notoriety threaten to topple the monarchy. In this book, a bestselling biographer looks at the merry lives of the Windsors, past and present, and examines why today's royal family may be the last of its kind. Photos.
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    Delightful Denver Doldrums

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    Alex thought that his Denver years were his salad days . . . and they were. But they were also rife with the trauma and repressed memories that would affect his life forever. They were seven years as the 70's transformed into the 80's and with all the jobs, relationships, and traveling, his eventual exit from his seven years in Denver ended up right back where he started-sort of.

    Written in a Jack Kerouac meets Hunter Thompson-like style, The Delightful Denver Doldrums is a fascinating travelogue into the world some will recognize and most will never forget.

    Barry Norman has been a media junkie, having worked in the magazine, newspaper, radio, television and film industries and a couple of side stints in aviation (two airlines and a ramp controller at the international tower for Hartsfield Airport in Atlanta). His career in television has included being a video tape editor for CNN: the Public Relations Manager for World Championship Wrestling; Information Manager for Six Olympic Games.

    In the music biz, he was the creator/writer/producer of the nationally syndicated, alternative radio show, Cross Currents and in the promotion department for Savage Records which released David Bowie's album, "Black Tie White Noise."

    In film, he was the Founder and Executive Director for the Dahlonega and Rome (GA) International Film Festivals and is also an award-winning filmmaker. His film Deadbeats stars a young Melissa McBride ("Carol" from The Walking Dead) and Mick Foley (Cactus Jack and Mankind from professional wrestling) and has been illegally pirated and downloaded all over the world.

    He has a BA in American History from Connecticut College; holds a certification in Magazine Publishing Procedures from New York University and also is certified in Music Business from The Music Business Institute and a Master of Fine Arts in Film Studies from Boston University.

    Barry is currently working on his 5th book and first work of fiction-

    Reciprocity and is also working on his first play, Screwjob, about the infamous, wrestling incident, The Montreal Screwjob. It is written in Shakespearean English.

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    Diary of Ma Yan; The Struggles and Hopes of a Chinese Schoolgirl (USED)

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    Wednesday, November 7

    My father gave me and my brother a little money. My stomach is all twisted up with hunger, but I don't want to spend the money on anything as frivolous as food. Because it's money my parents earn with their sweat and blood.

    I have to study well so that I won't ever again be tortured by hunger. . . .

    In a drought-stricken corner of rural China, an education can be the difference between a life of crushing poverty and the chance for a better future. But money is scarce, and the low wages paid for backbreaking work aren't always enough to pay school fees.

    Ma Yan's heart-wrenching, honest diary chronicles her struggle to escape hardship and bring prosperity to her family through her persistent, sometimes desperate, attempts to continue her schooling.

    First published in France in 2002, the diary of ma yan created an outpouring of support for this courageous teenager and others like her -- support that led to the creation of an international organization dedicated to helping these children . . . all because of one ordinary girl's extraordinary diary.

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    Dime Store Alchemy (USED)

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    In 'Dime-Store Alchemy', poet Charles Simic reflects on the life and work of Joseph Cornell, the maverick surrealist who is one of America's great artists. Simic's spare prose is as enchanting and luminous as the mysterious boxes of found objects for which Cornell is justly renowned.

    Disclosing the Past (USED)

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    Diva Julia: The Public Romance and Private Agony of Julia Ward Howe

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    Best known as the author of the Battle Hymn of the Republic, Julia Ward Howe (1819-1910) enjoyed great public acclaim as a writer, cultural arbiter, and social activist. In this biography, Ziegler draws upon letters, memoirs, and unpublished manuscripts to reveal the private struggle Howe endured
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    Dog; A Memior (USED)

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    A brutally honest memoir of talent, addiction, and recovery from one of the greatest baseball pitchers of all time. As a shy nineteen-year-old, Dwight Gooden swept into New York, lifting a team of crazy characters to World Series greatness and giving a beleaguered city a reason to believe. Then he threw it all away.
    Now, with fresh and sober eyes, the Mets' beloved Dr. K shares the intimate details of his life and career, revealing all the extraordinary highs and lows: The hidden traumas in his close-knit Tampa family. The thrill and pressure of being a young baseball phenom in New York. The raucous days and nights with the Mets' bad boys (and the real reason he missed the 1986 World Series Victory Parade). The self-destructive drug binges and the three World Series rings. His heartbreaking attempts at getting sober, the senseless damage to family and friends, and the unexpected way he finally saved his life--on VH1's Celebrity Rehab with Dr. Drew.

    In Doc, Gooden details his close friendships with many of baseball's greats: Pete Rose, George Streinbrenner, Joe Torre, and nephew Gary Sheffield. For the first time ever, he reveals the full story of his troubled relationship with fellow Mets superstar Darryl Strawberry. And he tells the moving story of the Yankees no-hitter he pitched for his dying father. Doc is a riveting baseball memoir by one of the game's most fascinating figures, and an inspiring story for anyone who has faced tough challenges in life.
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    Don Shula; A Biography of the Winningest Coach in NFL History

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    Here acclaimed sports historian Carlo DeVito captures the story of one of the greatest coaches in National Football history. This is must reading for fans of the Baltimore Colts, Miami Dolphins, and pro football.

    First distinguishing himself as a player with the Cleveland Browns (under the great Paul Brown), Baltimore Colts, and Washington Redskins, Donald Francis Shula went on to be the boy wonder of the NFL as a coach. After serving for three seasons as the defensive coordinator for the Detroit Lions, where he oversaw one of the NFL's toughest units,

    Shula was named the youngest head coach in NFL history when he took over the Baltimore Colts in 1963. But after public feuding with star quarterback Johnny Unitas and owner Carroll Rosenbloom, and despite leading the team to two NFL championship games, Shula accepted the job as head coach of the perennial doormat Miami Dolphins in 1970.

    Within a few seasons, he took the Dolphins to three straight Super Bowls, winning twice, including the only undefeated Super Bowl championship season in 1972 behind a bruising running attack led by two 1,000-yard rushers, Larry Csonka and Mercury Morris, as well as the unheralded "No-Name Defense."

    Shula won more games (328) than any other coach in NFL history, led his teams to six Super Bowls, and only posted a losing record twice in thirty-three seasons on the sideline. He was enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1997. Don Shula chronicles the life of one of the greatest minds ever to be involved with the game, from the dawn of modern football to the close of the twentieth century.

    Dore: Woman of the Mountains (USED)

    Dore: Woman of the Mountains (USED)

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    Before the Great Smoky Mountains became a national park, the region was a lush wilderness dotted with isolated farms. Into this land of unspoiled beauty, Dorie Woodruff Cope was born in 1899. In this evocative memoir, Dorie's daughter, Florence Cope Bush, traces a life at once extraordinary and yet typical of the many Appalachian farm families forced to leave their simple mountain homes for the cities, abandoning traditional ways for those born of "progress." Dorie's story begins with her childhood on an isolated mountain farm, where we see first-hand how her parents combined back-breaking labor with intense personal pride to produce everything their family needed--from food and clothing to tools and toys--from the land. Lumber companies began to invade the mountains, and Dorie's family took advantage of the financial opportunities offered by the lumber industry, not realizing that in giving up their lands they were also letting go of a way of life. Along with their machinery, the lumber companies brought in many young men, one of whom, Fred Cope, became Dorie's husband. After the lumber companies stripped the mountains of their timber, outsiders set the area aside as a national park, requiring Dorie, now married with a family of her own, to move outside of her beloved mountains. Through Dorie's eyes, we see how the mountain farmers were forced to abandon their beloved rural life-style and customs and assimilate into cities like Knoxville, Tennessee. Her experiences were shared by hundreds of Appalachians during the early twentieth century. However, Dorie's perseverance, strength of character, and deep love of the Smokies make this a unique and moving narrative.
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    Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzche & Kafka (USED)

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    How four of Europe's most mysterious and fascinating writers shaped the modern mind.

    Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Kafka were all outsiders in their societies, unable to fit into the accepted nineteenth-century categories of theology, philosophy, or belles lettres. Instead, they saw themselves both as the end products of a dying civilization and as prophets of the coming chaos of the twentieth century. In this brilliant combination of biography and lucid exposition, their apocalyptic visions of the future are woven together into a provocative portrait of modernity.

    "This small book has a depth of insight and a comprehensiveness of treatment beyond what its modesty of size and tone indicates. William Hubben...sees the spiritual destiny of Europe as one of transcending these masters. But to be transcended, their message must first be absorbed, and that is why the study of them is so important to us now." --William Barrett, The New York Times

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    Douglas MacArthur: American Warrior

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    A new, definitive life of an American icon, the visionary general who led American forces through three wars and foresaw his nation's great geopolitical shift toward the Pacific Rim--from the Pulitzer Prize finalist and bestselling author of Gandhi & Churchill

    Douglas MacArthur was arguably the last American public figure to be worshipped unreservedly as a national hero, the last military figure to conjure up the romantic stirrings once evoked by George Armstrong Custer and Robert E. Lee. But he was also one of America's most divisive figures, a man whose entire career was steeped in controversy. Was he an avatar or an anachronism, a brilliant strategist or a vainglorious mountebank? Drawing on a wealth of new sources, Arthur Herman delivers a powerhouse biography that peels back the layers of myth--both good and bad--and exposes the marrow of the man beneath.

    MacArthur's life spans the emergence of the United States Army as a global fighting force. Its history is to a great degree his story. The son of a Civil War hero, he led American troops in three monumental conflicts--World War I, World War II, and the Korean War. Born four years after Little Bighorn, he died just as American forces began deploying in Vietnam. Herman's magisterial book spans the full arc of MacArthur's journey, from his elevation to major general at thirty-eight through his tenure as superintendent of West Point, field marshal of the Philippines, supreme ruler of postwar Japan, and beyond. More than any previous biographer, Herman shows how MacArthur's strategic vision helped shape several decades of U.S. foreign policy. Alone among his peers, he foresaw the shift away from Europe, becoming the prophet of America's destiny in the Pacific Rim.

    Here, too, is a vivid portrait of a man whose grandiose vision of his own destiny won him enemies as well as acolytes. MacArthur was one of the first military heroes to cultivate his own public persona--the swashbuckling commander outfitted with Ray-Ban sunglasses, riding crop, and corncob pipe. Repeatedly spared from being killed in battle--his soldiers nicknamed him "Bullet Proof"--he had a strong sense of divine mission. "Mac" was a man possessed, in the words of one of his contemporaries, of a "supreme and almost mystical faith that he could not fail." Yet when he did, it was on an epic scale. His willingness to defy both civilian and military authority was, Herman shows, a lifelong trait--and it would become his undoing. Tellingly, MacArthur once observed, "Sometimes it is the order one disobeys that makes one famous."

    To capture the life of such an outsize figure in one volume is no small achievement. With Douglas MacArthur, Arthur Herman has set a new standard for untangling the legacy of this American legend.

    Praise for Douglas MacArthur

    "This is revisionist history at its best and, hopefully, will reopen a debate about the judgment of history and MacArthur's place in history."--New York Journal of Books

    "Unfailingly evocative . . . close to an epic . . . More than a biography, it is a tale of a time in the past almost impossible to contemplate today as having taken place, with MacArthur himself as a figure perhaps too remote to understand, but all the more important to encounter."--The New Criterion

    "With Douglas MacArthur: American Warrior, the prolific and talented historian Arthur Herman has delivered an expertly rendered, compulsively readable account that does full justice to MacArthur's monumental achievements without slighting his equally monumental flaws."--Commentary

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    Down Came the Rain

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    In her bestselling memoir, now in paperback, Brooke Shields shares with the world her deeply personal experience with postpartum depression When Brooke Shields welcomed her newborn daughter to the world, her joyful expectations were quickly followed by something unexpected--a crippling depression. In what is sure to strike a chord with the millions of women who suffer from depression after childbirth, Brooke Shields shares how she, too, battled a condition that is widely misunderstood, despite the fact that it affects many new mothers. She discusses the illness in the context of her life, including her struggle to get pregnant, the high expectations she had for herself and that others placed on her as a new mom, and the role of her husband, friends, and family as she struggled to attain her maternal footing in the midst of a disabling depression. Ultimately, Brooke shares how she found a way out through talk therapy, medication, and time.
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    Downhill Lie; a Hacker's Return to a Ruinous Sport (USED)

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    Filled with harrowing divots, deadly doglegs, and excruciating sandtraps, The Downhill Lie is a hilarious chronicle of mis-adventure that will have you rolling with laughter.

    Bestselling author Carl Hiaasen wisely quit golfing in 1973. But some ambitions refuse to die, and as the years passed and the memories of slices and hooks faded, it dawned on Carl that there might be one thing in life he could do better in middle age than he could as a youth. So gradually he ventured back to the rolling, frustrating green hills of the golf course, where he ultimately--and foolishly--agreed to compete in a country-club tournament against players who can actually hit the ball.

    Duchess, An Intimate Portrait of Sara, Duchess of York (USED)

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    Duke In His Own Words

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    John Wayne was more than just an on-screen personality beloved by millions the world over. His movie persona was justy that - a persona. The man behind the legend, whom friends and family called "Duke," "Everlovin'" and "Dad," was an even stronger example of old-school American masculinity than the characters he played on the screen. But until now, most only knew the man on the marquee.

    With Duke: In His Own Words, the Wayne Family has opened their private archives to enable the creation of this amazing compendium of John Wayne's personal letters, telegrams, cards and memos. In these unaltered exchanges with people from every station of life and all corners of the globe, Duke's true identity jumps off the page. Whether he's writing to fans or family, platoons or presidents, he's always candid, colorfui and quick with a joke.

    Inside you'll find:
    - An introduction by Ethan Wayne, John Wayne's son
    - Exclusive, personal letters Duke sent to family members, friends and fans - along with those to American troops and former Comanders in Chief
    - Firsthand stories and anecdotes from Duke's nearest and dearest
    - Never-before-seen photos straight from the Wayne Family archives

    Duke: In His Own Words offers an honest portrait of the good-natured family man, the opinionated patriot, the humble superstar - all sides of the real John Wayne, and all presented by the man himself.

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    Dying: A Memoir (USED)

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    At the age of sixty, Cory Taylor is dying of melanoma-related brain cancer. Her illness is no longer treatable: she now weighs less than her neighbor's retriever. As her body weakens, she describes the experience--the vulnerability and strength, the courage and humility, the anger and acceptance--of knowing she will soon die.

    Written in the space of a few weeks, in a tremendous creative surge, this powerful and beautiful memoir is a clear-eyed account of what dying teaches: Taylor describes the tangle of her feelings, remembers the lives and deaths of her parents, and examines why she would like to be able to choose the circumstances of her death.

    Taylor's last words offer a vocabulary for readers to speak about the most difficult thing any of us will face. And while Dying: A Memoir is a deeply affecting meditation on death, it is also a funny and wise tribute to life.

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    Eating Animals (USED)

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    Part memoir and part investigative report, Eating Animals is the groundbreaking moral examination of vegetarianism, farming, and the food we eat every day that inspired the documentary of the same name.

    Bestselling author Jonathan Safran Foer spent much of his life oscillating between enthusiastic carnivore and occasional vegetarian. For years he was content to live with uncertainty about his own dietary choices-but once he started a family, the moral dimensions of food became increasingly important.

    Faced with the prospect of being unable to explain why we eat some animals and not others, Foer set out to explore the origins of many eating traditions and the fictions involved with creating them. Traveling to the darkest corners of our dining habits, Foer raises the unspoken question behind every fish we eat, every chicken we fry, and every burger we grill.

    Part memoir and part investigative report, Eating Animals is a book that, in the words of the Los Angeles Times, places Jonathan Safran Foer "at the table with our greatest philosophers" -and a must-read for anyone who cares about building a more humane and healthy world.

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    Echoes in the Mirror

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    THIS STORY of an ORDINARY WOMAN is a STORY for ALL WOMEN.

    For many women the third chapter of life is a time to revisit their past and reflect on how life's experiences have influenced the person they've become. Belle DeCosta's journey down memory lane exposes a path laid bare, one filled with unexpected potholes, bumps, detours, and harrowing hairpin turns.

    In her memoir Echoes in the Mirror, Belle reveals the story behind her astonishing journey. One of an unstable childhood with multiple family moves, an alcoholic father, and the drastic steps she took as a young teenager to escape it. It's a story of secrets kept, failed marriages, single parenting, promises made, and dreams followed.

    Belle's story of inner strength, and emotional survival will take you from the lowest valleys to the highest peaks, and finally, down the unique path she follows towards self-acceptance and peace.

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    Edison vs. Tesla; The Battle Over Their Last Invention

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    Thomas Edison closely following the alternative physics work of Albert Einstein and Max Planck, convincing him that there was an entire reality unseen by the human eye. This led to the last and least-known of all Edison's inventions, the spirit phone. His former associate, now bitter rival, Nikola Tesla, was also developing at the same time a similar mysterious device. Edison vs. Tesla examines their quest to talk to the dead. It reveals:

    Edison's little-known near-death experience formed his theory that animate life forms don't die, but rather change the nature of their composition. It is this foundational belief that drove him to proceed with the spirit phone.
    Tesla monitored Edison's paranormal work, with both men racing to create a device that picked up the frequencies of discarnate spirits, what today is called EVP (Electronic Voice Phenomenon).
    Both men were way ahead of their time, delving into artificial intelligence and robotics.
    Although mystery and lore surround the details of the last decade of Edison's life, many skeptics have denied the existence of the mysterious spirit phone. The authors have researched both Edison's and Tesla's journals, as well as contemporary articles and interviews with the inventors to confirm that tests were actually done with this device. They also have the full cooperation of the Charles Edison fund, affording them access to rare photos and graphics to support their text. Edison vs. Tesla sheds light on this weird invention and demonstrates the rivalry that drove both men to new discoveries.

    Educated

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    #1 NEW YORK TIMES, WALL STREET JOURNAL, AND BOSTON GLOBE BESTSELLER - NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW - ONE OF PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA'S FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR - BILL GATES'S HOLIDAY READING LIST - FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE'S AWARD IN AUTOBIOGRAPHY - FINALIST FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE'S JOHN LEONARD PRIZE FOR BEST FIRST BOOK - FINALIST FOR THE PEN/JEAN STEIN BOOK AWARD - FINALIST FOR THE LOS ANGELES BOOK PRIZE

    NAMED ONE OF PASTE'S BEST MEMOIRS OF THE DECADE - NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The Washington Post - O: The Oprah Magazine - Time - NPR - Good Morning America - San Francisco Chronicle - The Guardian - The Economist - Financial Times - Newsday - New York Post - theSkimm - Refinery29 - Bloomberg - Self - Real Simple - Town & Country - Bustle - Paste - Publishers Weekly - Library Journal - LibraryReads - BookRiot - Pamela Paul, KQED - New York Public Library

    An unforgettable memoir about a young girl who, kept out of school, leaves her survivalist family and goes on to earn a PhD from Cambridge University


    Born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho, Tara Westover was seventeen the first time she set foot in a classroom. Her family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when one of Tara's older brothers became violent. When another brother got himself into college, Tara decided to try a new kind of life. Her quest for knowledge transformed her, taking her over oceans and across continents, to Harvard and to Cambridge University. Only then would she wonder if she'd traveled too far, if there was still a way home.

    "Beautiful and propulsive . . . Despite the singularity of [Tara Westover's] childhood, the questions her book poses are universal: How much of ourselves should we give to those we love? And how much must we betray them to grow up?"--Vogue

    "Westover has somehow managed not only to capture her unsurpassably exceptional upbringing, but to make her current situation seem not so exceptional at all, and resonant for many others."--The New York Times Book Review

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    Education of a Yankee; An American Memoir (USED)

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    Written with a delightful sense of irony and a profound tenderness, The Education of a Yankee is an engaging memoir that skillfully reveals the grand, eccentric, and occasionally tragic history of a very unconventional family. Judson Hale was born into Boston's very proper Brahmin world, the son of a wealthy father who loved sailing and horseback riding and a beautiful, talented mother who loved opera and sang professionally. But readers expecting a conventional account of New England privilege will be delightfully surprised. The fate of Hale's older brother, Drake, led his parents to embark on a dramatic, extravagant, and visionary undertaking that changed the family's history and brought a remarkable adventure to the small town of Vanceboro, Maine. So began an idealistic and wonderful dream that was to shape Hale's childhood and adolescence, but which ended differently from what his parents had envisioned. The Education of a Yankee, at once funny and touching, is full of marvelous anecdotes about life on this unusual farm. We watch anxiously as he finally meets his brother, Drake, and see him wrestle with the challenges of joining the family-owned Yankee magazine, which, under his editorial direction, has become the third largest regional magazine in the country.
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    Eiger Obsession

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    In the 1960s an American named John Harlin II changed the face of Alpine climbing. Gutsy and gorgeous -- he was known as "the blond god" -- Harlin successfully summitted some of the most treacherous mountains in Europe. But it was the north face of the Eiger that became Harlin's obsession. Living with his wife and two children in Leysin, Switzerland, he spent countless hours planning to climb, waiting to climb, and attempting to climb the massive vertical face. It was the Eiger direct -- the "direttissima" -- with which John Harlin was particularly obsessed. He wanted to be the first to complete it, and everyone in the Alpine world knew it.

    John Harlin III was nine years old when his father made another attempt on a direct ascent of the notorious Eiger. Harlin had put together a terrific team, and, despite unending storms, he was poised for the summit dash. It was the moment he had long waited for. When Harlin's rope broke, 2,000 feet from the summit, he plummeted 4,000 feet to his death. In the shadow of tragedy, young John Harlin III came of age possessed with the very same passion for risk that drove his father. But he had also promised his mother, a beautiful and brilliant young widow, that he would not be an Alpine climber.

    Harlin moved from Europe to America, and, with an insatiable sense of wanderlust, he reveled in downhill skiing and rock-climbing. For years he successfully denied the clarion call of the mountain that killed his father. But in 2005, John Harlin could resist no longer. With his nine-year-old daughter, Siena -- his very age at the time of his father's death -- and with an IMAX Theatre filmmaking crew watching, Harlin set off to slay the Eiger. This is an unforgettable story about fathers and sons, climbers and mountains, and dreamers who dare to challenge the earth.

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    Eighty-Dollar Champion; Snowman, The Horse That Inspired a Nation (USED)

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    #1 "NEW YORK TIMES "BESTSELLER
    November 1958: the National Horse Show at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Into the rarefied atmosphere of wealth and tradition comes the most unlikely of horses--a drab white former plow horse named Snowman--and his rider, Harry de Leyer. They were the longest of all longshots--and their win was the stuff of legend.
    Harry de Leyer first saw the horse he would name Snowman on a bleak winter afternoon between the slats of a rickety truck bound for the slaughterhouse. He recognized the spark in the eye of the beaten-up horse and bought him for eighty dollars. On Harry's modest farm on Long Island, the horse thrived. But the recent Dutch immigrant and his growing family needed money, and Harry was always on the lookout for the perfect thoroughbred to train for the show-jumping circuit--so he reluctantly sold Snowman to a farm a few miles down the road.
    But Snowman had other ideas about what Harry needed. When he turned up back at Harry's barn, dragging an old tire and a broken fence board, Harry knew that he had misjudged the horse. And so he set about teaching this shaggy, easygoing horse how to fly. One show at a time, against extraordinary odds and some of the most expensive thoroughbreds alive, the pair climbed to the very top of the sport of show jumping.
    Here is the dramatic and inspiring rise to stardom of an unlikely duo, based on the insight and recollections of "the Flying Dutchman" himself. Their story captured the heart of Cold War-era America--a story of unstoppable hope, inconceivable dreams, and the chance to have it all. Elizabeth Letts's message is simple: Never give up, even when the obstacles seem sky-high. There is something extraordinary in all of us.

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    Eleanor Roosevelt: The War Years and After

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    One of the New York Times's 100 Notable Books of 2016
    One of NPR's 10 Best Books of 2016

    "Heartachingly relevant...the Eleanor Roosevelt who inhabits these meticulously crafted pages transcends both first-lady history and the marriage around which Roosevelt scholarship has traditionally pivoted." -- The Wall Street Journal

    The final volume in the definitive biography of America's greatest first lady.



    "Monumental and inspirational...Cook skillfully narrates the epic history of the war years... [a] grand biography." -- The New York Times Book Review

    Historians, politicians, critics, and readers everywhere have praised Blanche Wiesen Cook's biography of Eleanor Roosevelt as the essential portrait of a woman who towers over the twentieth century. The third and final volume takes us through World War II, FDR's death, the founding of the UN, and Eleanor Roosevelt's death in 1962. It follows the arc of war and the evolution of a marriage, as the first lady realized the cost of maintaining her principles even as the country and her husband were not prepared to adopt them. Eleanor Roosevelt continued to struggle for her core issues--economic security, New Deal reforms, racial equality, and rescue--when they were sidelined by FDR while he marshaled the country through war. The chasm between Eleanor and Franklin grew, and the strains on their relationship were as political as they were personal. She also had to negotiate the fractures in the close circle of influential women around her at Val-Kill, but through it she gained confidence in her own vision, even when forced to amend her agenda when her beliefs clashed with government policies on such issues as neutrality, refugees, and eventually the threat of communism. These years--the war years--made Eleanor Roosevelt the woman she became: leader, visionary, guiding light. FDR's death in 1945 changed her world, but she was far from finished, returning to the spotlight as a crucial player in the founding of the United Nations.

    This is a sympathetic but unblinking portrait of a marriage and of a woman whose passion and commitment has inspired generations of Americans to seek a decent future for all people. Modest and self-deprecating, a moral force in a turbulent world, Eleanor Roosevelt was unique.

    Elizabeth Tudor Portrait of a Queen (USED)

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    End of the World as We Know It

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    It was the 1950s, a time of calm, a time when all things were new and everything seemed possible. A few years before, a noble war had been won, and now life had returned to normal.
    For one little boy, however, life had become anything but "normal."
    To all appearances, he and his family lived an almost idyllic life. The father was a respected professor, the mother a witty and elegant lady, someone everyone loved. They were parents to three bright, smiling children: two boys and a girl. They lived on a sunny street in a small college town nestled neatly in a leafy valley. They gave parties, hosted picnics, went to church just like their neighbors. To all appearances, their life seemed ideal. But it was, in fact, "all" appearances.
    Lineage, tradition, making the right impression these were matters of great importance, especially to the mother. But behind the facade this family had created lurked secrets so dark, so painful for this one little boy, that his life would never be the same.
    It is through the eyes of that boy a grown man now, revisiting that time that we see this seemingly serene world and watch as it slowly comes completely and irrevocably undone.
    Beautifully written, often humorous, sometimes sweet, ultimately shocking, this is a son's story of looking back with both love and anger at the parents who gave him life and then robbed him of it, who created his world and then destroyed it.
    As author Lee Smith, who knew this world and this family, observed, "Alcohol may be the real villain in this pain-permeated, exquisitely written memoir of childhood but it is also filled with absolutely dead-on social commentary of this very particular time and place. A brave, haunting, riveting book.""